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Should Religious Jews Revolt Against Secular Governments?

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Should Religious Jews Revolt Against Secular Governments?

According to the talmudic sage Rabbi Yitzchak, the advent of the Messianic Era is a revolutionary upturning of heretical governments. The sage Rava offers another, less violent interpretation of this revolution.
Communism, Moshiach and the Future Redemption, Revolution, Tzaraat, Tazria-Metzora, Tazria

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Avraham May 21, 2019

I am from a family of the original bolshiveks so this is really inspirational to me. Love the closer! Reply

Shmuel G Amerika April 5, 2019

Rabbi, you really look uncomfortably like Lenin there Reply

K. Brooks Toronto April 3, 2019

Very well done. Rabbi, you have raised so many intensely interesting questions. Alot to unpack, per se.

But what if the 'heretical state' is a democracy? Agree to the notion that modern democracy is in a state of dysfunction ... but can religion transform it? A very secular question, on one hand, but for believing souls, the simple fact that God is at the center of all consciousness and emanation, it will be called a 'revolution' a 'reformation'. It's the difference between thinking peace, being peace and building peace, instead of just 'hoping for peace' and therefore, taking for granted the peace that appears to just magically 'arrive'. But it's not magic, as it was build on the prayers of the faithful all along. Footsteps of the Messiah can be heard now, how deafened must some be, dreaming away, thinking that a apocalyptic elephant has to arrive first? Do we really have to take it that far?

We will continue to need rabbinical supervision, that i am sure of!! Reply

Michael Chighel Jerusalem April 9, 2019
in response to K. Brooks:

The messianic "revolution," or as you smartly say, "transformation," is the result of a world-wide shift in consciousness. This shift depends above all on our actions. "The deed is the main thing." (Pirke Avot) No magic necessary. The deed -- the mitzvah -- is more powerful than any magic in the cosmos. Reply

Deborah Porter UK April 3, 2019

Love these videos I look forward to your video every week, fantastic thank you. Reply

Moshe April 3, 2019

Thank you, thank you, thank you! I also grew up in "that place", and i must say that the trauma of communism is even greater than that of the holocaust and it must be fixed. These concepts of tikkun have to reach people in a way similar to the way that the concepts of the "leumat ze" spread a century ago. Kol hakavod! Now we need much more of this, in many more shapes and forms. Reply

aryeh ben zion April 2, 2019

Thank you for the fascinating presentation. I was intrigued by the Rabbi Yitzach quotation, would you be kind enough as to indicate the citation for that? Enjoy your work. Thank you. Reply

Michael Chighel Jerusalem April 9, 2019
in response to aryeh:

Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Sanhedrin, page 97a. Reply

Anonymous April 1, 2019

i'm addicted to your videos Reply

Andrew Pimentel Lynn April 1, 2019

Simply... Thank you! Reply

Chani UK March 31, 2019

Love it! I love all your Torah thoughts. Shkoyach! And thank you Reply

Michael Chighel Jerusalem April 1, 2019
in response to Chani:

Chani, I'm deeply grateful for your blessing for strength! Just to set the record straight, though, the wonderful Torah thoughts are not mine at all. They're the Rebbe's. I am simply very fortunate to be the Rebbe's translator. Brokhos to you and yours! Reply

Chani UK April 1, 2019
in response to Michael Chighel:

Todah 😊 and the same to you. I guess the Rebbe was right (as usual) when he said that a Rebbe is even closer to his chasidim and even more alive once he's gone from this world. Bracha v'hatzlacha Reply

Peter L Weinwurm Toronto Canada March 31, 2019

Thank you Michael.

I use to live in Communist Czechoslovakia, with no Rabbis , no Torah and no Synagogues.
It was the most confusing time, with no Jews around to explain it why.
My own ignorance of Judaism and my own living experiences with assimilation in Czechoslovakia lead me to pursue a secular lifestyle, outside of Jewish duties experimenting with other practices and distorting my own Jewish roots for a long time, disenfranchising from God. Not allowing Him to enter my heart, which is the hardest part of any confession. This is what the assimilation will do. Inflicting us with confusion and uncertainty, harming us indirectly and directly with cruel painful consequences.

Teshuvah

I am still limping, bearing scars, I am still asking for forgiveness
I am still learning to repent, to know how,
with regrets arguing my case in an unexpected crowd,
bending desire to fit in, to commit
as they say, Hebrews did, at the Giving of the Torah.
To retrieve inheritance,To reclaim it. Reply

Michael Chighel Jerusalem April 1, 2019
in response to Peter L Weinwurm:

My parents grew up in Communist Romania, escaping not long before I was born. And so I was raised in the shadow of that trauma. Baruch Hashem, the Torah is stronger than every political illness and every trauma! From strength to strength, dear Peter! Reply