The Kabbalah of Self-Knowledge

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The Kabbalah of Self-Knowledge

If you truly understood what you are and where you stand, how would you feel about yourself? Would you be elated? Utterly inadequate? Both at once? A mystical guide to self-knowledge as the ultimate antidote to depression.
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Tanya, Identity & Self-Knowledge, Self Esteem; Self Confidence, Depression

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Paul Bourgeois May 8, 2018

You are saying live in the moment and appreciate now? Reply

Amichai Schneller St.Cloud MN February 6, 2014

Rabbi Tzvi Freeman/ self knowledge, great teachings. I love this so much.
this is a unique way to humble ourselves. Reply

chuna April 7, 2013

huh... I love the videos in general. The intro was great, as someone commented. And as another commented from houston, this could've been a whole lot better. It was a bit confusing, and not helped by the half questions from Michael and the interrupted (or not even interrupted but not fully connected), answers.

But I almost got something amazingly powerful from this. Do it over!! Reply

Joseph April 29, 2012

GREAT Thank you!

Rabbi Tzvi Freeman is simply fantastic! Reply

orli February 5, 2011

It is amazing how contradictions work towards advancing. We really are made in His image. Only in Him adverse forces can coexist.

PS:There is distortion between sound and the speed of image. I do not know the technical term.Please correct it. Reply

Anonymous ft lauderdale , fl January 25, 2010

Michael great ? and follow up I need clarification Rabbi Freeman was saying that we need to have a map of where we r and where we r going. Michael said maybe it is better to be depressed because of a failure for achieving a false goal. It makes sense that if a person bases his achievements on a superficial goal then the original map theory can not really be used. Is that correct? Or did I miss the point? Reply

Ilana New York, N December 24, 2009

Fuh-GET-it! Adorably funny intro. Tvi Freeman videos are THE BEST.
Perfect blend of humor and spiritual education. Reply

Cathy Niagara Falls, NY January 10, 2009

This was AWESOME! Can we hope for more of these to follow up? Reply

cma January 8, 2009

see similar article Man as a verb
by rabbi tzvi freeman

came across it by hashgocho protis (divine providence) Reply

Iacov January 8, 2009

Dr. Kigel Dr. Kigel, you are the best and we are proud that you are here :)
Your sense of humor, honesty and open-mindedness are praise-worthy!

Hatslacha raba Reply

tzina nechumah Jerusalem, ISRAEL January 6, 2009

Messages: Kabbalah of Self-Knowledge. One of the few things I miss most after leaveing the diaspera is the true joy of studying Tanya with Rabbi Freeman and watching Messages on Sunday nights! If possible please post as available on your exvellent website!

We each ask of G-d that we be a worthy vessel for His will. Sometimes He lifts us up high to achieve His purpose. Sometimes we are lowered and again G-d willing. to achieve His purpose. To be worthy of His tasks we must learn to put aside our own ego. That sense of 'I'. The battle between the animal and G-dly soul. If our journey is righteous and it is G-d's will. should this not be enough for us? Are the worldly rewards in this life so necessary? Is it not enough that each day He returns our spirit to us? Blesses us wth the goodness of family and friends and loves us each as His first born children?

Kol Tov! Reply

Anonymous houston, Tx January 5, 2009

I loved Rabbi Tzvi Freeman's elaboration of depression, I understood him clearly. On the other hand, I felt that Michael Kigel sort of "over works" the points that Rabbi Tzvi made, or, he swings the point in another more confusing tangent....(it was sort of unnecessary)...it felt like he was interrupting a lot and complicating the points. I don't mean to be critical, it just felt Kigel's analysis were "overdone". Nevertheless, I appreciated thevideo. G-d Bless. Reply

Host, Michael Chighel, talks to some of the world's greatest experts about the masterpiece of Hasidic thought, the book of Tanya.