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Daily Study: Hayom Yom

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Monday 3 Adar I 5703
Torah lessons: Chumash: T'ruma, Sheini with Rashi.
Tehillim: 18-22.
Tanya: On the contrary (p. 117)...been explained earlier. (p. 117).

The Alter Rebbe said: The mitzva of ahavat yisrael1 extends to anyone born into the people of Israel, even if you have never met him. How much more so does it extend to every member - man or woman of the Jewish community where you live, who belongs to your own community.

Compiled and arranged by the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, of righteous memory, in 5703 (1943) from the talks and letters of the sixth Chabad Rebbe, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn, of righteous memory.

Footnotes
1.
"Love of one's fellow." See Ahavat Yisrael Kehot; see below, 15 Kislev.
Wednesday Adar Sheini 3 5703
Torah lessons: Chumash: P'kudei, Revi'i with Rashi.
Tehillim: 18-22.
Tanya: All the above (p. 155)...in the other. (p. 155).

The Tzemach Tzedek told a chassid who had mastered the entire Talmud and related works and had a profound grasp of Chassidus: Kabalat ol1 transforms one's being. When a simple servant serves out of kabalat ol you can see that he bears the yoke of service even when he sleeps. When a pre-eminent savant and brilliant scholar acquires this sort of kabalat ol, even he can attain the height and value of the simple, sincere person who has mesirat nefesh - total devotion, self-sacrifice.

Compiled and arranged by the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, of righteous memory, in 5703 (1943) from the talks and letters of the sixth Chabad Rebbe, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn, of righteous memory.

Footnotes
1.
Lit. "accepting the yoke (of Heaven)." Chassidus compares the avoda of the scholarly who are intellectually motivated, aware of the depth and nuances of Torah and mitzvot, with the unquestioning obedience of the simple man, motivated by pure faith, ("pure" meaning unalloyed by rationales and ulterior motives). Obviously each has a unique quality. Chassidus demands that the learned man acquire the virtue of unlettered, simple faith superimposed on scholarship bringing him to a fulfillment otherwise denied him. Intellect itself has its limitations, the differing quality of the individual's knowledge, for example. Service based on reason cannot surpass reason, so the avoda is always restricted, limited. Furthermore, knowledge is never absolute, so despite commitment and piety there may be gnawing if unarticulated doubts. Kabalat ol transcends reason and penetrates to, or emanates from, the core or essence of the individual. His involvement is total. See 21 Adar I, and Tevet 5.
Daily Quote
The truly humble soul recognizes that its mission in life lies in the pragmatic aspect of Torah, both in studying it for himself and explaining it to others; and in doing acts of material kindness by lending an empathizing mind and counsel from afar regarding household concerns, though the majority, if not all, of these concerns are things of falsehood. For the loftiest beginnings are rooted in the end.
  –From a note penned by Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi shortly before his passing
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