What greater conceit, and what greater heartlessness, can there be than to give a "reason" for the death and torture of millions of innocent men, women and children? Can we presume to assume that an explanation, small enough to fit inside the finite bounds of human reason, can explain a horror of such magnitude? We can only concede that there are things that lie beyond the finite ken of the human mind.

It is not our task to justify G‑d on this. Only G‑d Himself can answer for what He allowed to happen. And the only answer we will accept is the immediate and complete Redemption that will forever banish evil from the face of the earth and bring to light the intrinsic goodness and perfection of G‑d's creation.

There are those who argued that the Holocaust disproves the existence of G‑d or His providence over our lives. But if there is anything that the Holocaust has decisively disproven, it is any possible faith in a human-based morality. In pre-war Europe, it was the German people who epitomized culture, scientific advance and philosophic morality. And these very same people perpetrated the most vile atrocities known to human history! If nothing else, the Holocaust has taught us that a moral and civilized existence is possible only through the belief in and the acceptance of the Divine authority.

Indeed, our outrage, our incessant challenge to G‑d over what has occurred — this itself is a most powerful attestation to our belief in Him and our faith in His goodness. Because if we did not, underneath it all, possess this faith, what is it that we are outraged at? The blind workings of fate? The random arrangement of quarks that make up the universe? It is only because we believe in G‑d, because we are convinced that there is right and there is wrong and that right must, and ultimately will, triumph, that we cry out, as Moses did: "Why, my G‑d, have you done evil to Your people?!"

But the most important thing about the Holocaust is not how we do or do not understand it, nor, even, how we memorialize its victims, but what we do about it. If we allow the pain and despair to dishearten us from raising a new generation of Jews with a strong commitment to their Jewishness, then Hilter's "final solution" will be realized, G‑d forbid. But if we rebuild, if we raise a generation proud of and committed to their Jewishness, we will have triumphed. The Jewish people has been so heavily decimated that each of us must be made to count, and to count doubly.