"There will not be a woman who loses her young or who is barren in your land. I shall fill the number of your days."1

This verse comes in sequence to the preceding verse. After the Torah promises:2 "And you shall serve G‑d your L‑rd, and He shall bless your bread and your water, and I shall remove sickness from your midst," it continues, promising: "There will not be a woman who loses her young…." [These verses are conveying blessings] in the three fundamental areas of concern: children, life and health, and sustenance, promising that G‑d's blessing will be manifest amply and prodigiously.

"He shall bless your bread and your water" is a promise for ample sustenance. [The preface] "He shall bless" indicates that not only will there be enough sustenance to meet one's needs, but there will be increased blessing, truly abundant sustenance.

With regard to life and health, the verse continues: "I shall remove sickness from your midst." Moreover, it promises: "I shall fill the number of your days" which is a promise of long life. Similarly, with regard to children, it promises: "There will not be a woman who loses her young or who is barren in your land." Implied is a blessing for giving birth to children, [promising that] no one will be barren and [assuring that] the children will continue to thrive afterwards as well, as implied by the phrase "…not be a woman who loses her young." Indeed, that phrase implies that the children will continue living until the parents reach old age, as apparent from the narrative concerning Yaakov our Patriarch. During his old age, he thought that he had lost one of his sons, and he said:3 "As I have been bereaved4 [of a child], I am bereaved."

[The blessing is introduced by] the phrase "There will not be a woman who loses her young." As stated in several sources,5 such a Biblical construction enables a verse to be interpreted in two ways: a) as a command; and b) as a promise. Thus the verse, "There will not be a woman who loses her young or who is barren" can be interpreted in two ways: a command [to the Jewish people]6 that there may not be a woman who loses her young or who is barren; and a promise that such a situation will not come about. Implied is that when a person does what is dependent on him so that there will not be a woman who loses her young or who is barren,7 G‑d promises that such undesirable circumstances will, in fact, not occur.

Summary

The Torah promises: "And you shall serve G‑d your L‑rd, and He shall bless your bread and your water, and I shall remove sickness from your midst. There will not be a woman who loses her young…." These verses convey blessings to the Jewish people in the three fundamental areas of concern: children, life and health, and sustenance, promising that G‑d's blessing will be manifest amply and prodigiously.

The clause "There will not be a woman who loses her young…" can be interpreted in two ways: a) as a command to the Jews in their Divine service; and b) as a promise. When the Jews carry out the spiritual service implied by that phrase, G‑d will fulfill the promise and bring about that blessing.