The 168th prohibition is that a kohen gadol is forbidden from becoming tameh by means of a dead body, regardless of the type of contact — whether through touching or carrying.1

The source of this prohibition is G‑d's statement,2 "He shall not become tameh [even] for his father or mother."

You might think that this mitzvah and the previous one3 are all one idea, and the phrase, "He shall not become tameh [even] for his father or mother," is merely explaining [the previous phrase4]. But this is not the case; there are two prohibitions, "He shall not come," and "He shall not become tameh." [We see this from] the words of the Sifra:5 "He is punished for transgressing, 'He shall not come,' and he is punished for transgressing, 'He shall not become tameh.' "

These prohibitions [regarding a kohen gadol] also apply to a regular kohen, because of a gezeira shavah.6 Our Sages said, "Just as the kohen gadol is forbidden from becoming tameh through a dead body by two prohibitions — 'He shall not come' and 'He shall not become tameh' — so too the regular kohen. Since he is prohibited from becoming tameh,7 he also has the prohibition, 'He shall not come.' " This prohibition, however, is not counted separately, for the reason given in the Second Introductory Principle.8

But we have counted these [of the kohen gadol] as two separate mitzvos because there are two separate statements: "He shall not come" and "He shall not become tameh." And the prohibition "he shall not come" is independent of "he shall not become tameh," as our Sages, guardians of the Oral Tradition, said, "He is punished for transgressing, 'He shall not come,' and he is punished for transgressing, 'He shall not become tameh.' "