1

It is an accepted presumption that all movable property belongs to the person who is in physical possession of it.' This applies even if the plaintiff brought witnesses who testify that the movable property in question was known to belong to the plaintiff.

What is implied? A plaintiff lodges a claim against a defendant: "This garment..." or "This utensil that is in your possession..." or "... that is in your house belongs to me..,", "... I entrusted it to you for safekeeping...", or "... I lent it to you. Here are witnesses who knew that it was previously in my domain."

The defendant responds: "That is not so. You sold it to me," or "...You gave it to me as a present," the defendant is required to take only a sh'vuat hesset and is freed of responsibility.

א

כל המטלטלין בחזקת זה שהן תחת ידו, אע"פ שהביא התובע עדים שהמטלטלין הללו ידועין לו, כיצד בגד זה או כלי זה שבידך או שבתוך ביתך שלי הוא, או הפקדתיהו אצלך, או השאלתיהו לך, והרי העדים שהן יודעין אותו מקודם ברשותי, והנתבע אומר לא כי אלא אתה מכרתו לי או נתתו לי במתנה הרי זה הנתבע נשבע היסת ונפטר.

2

If the defendant claims that the movable property he is holding is security, he may claim up to its value. He must, however, take an oath while holding a sacred object. Afterwards, he may collect his due, as explained.

ב

טען שהוא משכון בידו יכול לטעון עד כדי דמיו ונשבע בנקיטת חפץ ונוטל כמו שביארנו.

3

When does the above apply? To articles that are not made to lend out or rent out - e.g., garments, produce, household articles, merchandise and the like. Different rules apply with regard to articles that are made to lend out or rent out. Although they are found in the possession of a particular person and there are no witnesses that the original owner lent or rented out this article to this person, it is an accepted presumption that they belong to their original owner.

What is implied? Reuven owned a utensil that was made to lend or rent out, and he has witnesses who know that such an article belonged to him. This utensil is presently in the possession of Shimon. Reuven claims that he lent it or rented it to him," while Shimon claims that Reuven sold it to him, gave it to him as a present or entrusted it to him as security. We do not accept Shimon's claim. Instead, Reuven may take his utensil after taking a sh'vuat hesset in response to Shimon's claim.

Even if Shimon died, Reuven may take his utensil. The Geonim ruled that Reuven must take a sh'vuat hesset, for we advance claims on behalf of an heir.

ג

במה דברים אמורים בדברים שאינן עשויין להשאיל ולהשכיר, כגון בגדים ופירות וכלי תשמיש הבית ודברים של סחורה וכיוצא בהן, אבל דברים העשויין להשאיל ולהשכיר אף על פי שהן תחת ידו של זה ואע"פ שלא השאילו כלי זה ולא השכירו לו בעדים הרי הן בחזקת בעליהן, כיצד ראובן שהיה לו כלי העשוי להשאיל ולהשכיר ויש לו עדים שהוא ידוע לו והרי אותו הכלי תחת יד שמעון וראובן טוען שהוא שאול או שכור, ושמעון טוען אתה מכרתו לי אתה נתתו לי במתנה אתה משכנתו בידי אינו נאמן, אלא ראובן נוטל כליו ונשבע היסת על טענת שמעון, ואפילו מת שמעון הרי ראובן נוטל כליו, והורו הגאונים שישבע היסת שטוענין ליורש.

4

When does the above apply? When the utensil can be seen in the possession of Shimon.

Different rules apply when, however, Reuven lodges a claim against Shimon saying: "You have this-and-this utensil of mine. You rented it. Give it back to me. I have witnesses who know that it belongs to me." If Shimon responds: "You sold it to me" or "You gave it to me," his word is accepted. He must take a sh'vuat hesset and then he is released of all obligations. The rationale is since he could say: "Nothing like this ever happened. I do not have anything that belonged to you," we accept his word if he claims: "I have the article, but you sold it to me."

ד

במה דברים אמורים כשהיה כלי זה נראה ועומד ביד שמעון, אבל אם ראובן טען ואמר לשמעון כלי פלוני יש לי בידך ושכור הוא הוציאו אלי והרי יש לי עדים שהוא ידוע לי, ואמר לו שמעון אתה מכרתו לי אתה נתתו לי במתנה נאמן ונשבע שמעון היסת ונפטר, מתוך שיכול לומר לא היו דברים מעולם ואין בידי כלום נאמן לומר שישנו אצלי ואתה מכרתו לי.

5

The above-mentioned concepts apply only when the owner of the utensil claims: "I entrusted it to you" or "I lent it to you." Different laws apply if, however, he claims: "This article is mine. It was stolen, lost or taken by robbery." Although he brings witnesses who testify that the article was known to be his, if the person in possession of the article says: "I do not know what you are talking about. Someone else sold it to me or gave it to me as a present," we allow it to remain in that person's possession although it is an article that is made to be lent out or rented out. He is not required to take an oath at all, because there is no claim against him.

ה

אין כל הדברים האלו אמורים אלא שהיה בעל הכלי טוען אני הפקדתיו אצלך או השאלתיהו אצלך, אבל אם טען שכלי זה היה שלי ונגנב או אבד או נגזל והביא עדים שהוא ידוע לו וזה שתחת ידו אומר איני יודע אבל אחרים מכרוהו לי או נתנוהו לי במתנה, אף על פי שהוא מדברים שעשויין להשאיל ולהשכיר מעמידין אותו ביד זה שהוא בידו ואינו נשבע כלל שהרי אין לו טוען.

6

If a well-founded report has circulated that utensils belonging to the original owner have been stolen, the person in possession of the article may take an oath while holding a sacred article, stating how much he spent on the article. The original owner must reimburse him for this expense and may then take his article, as stated in Hilchot Geneivah.

If the defendant claims: "You sold it to me" or "You gave it to me as a present," he must take a sh'vuat hesset, and he is then allowed to maintain possession of the article, even though a well-founded report has circulated that utensils belonging to the original owner have been stolen, provided the article was not made to be lent or rented out.

From these laws, the following concept can be derived: A person has movable property in his possession and another person claims that it belongs to him. The defendant could claim that he purchased it. Thus, he would be required to take a sh'vuat hesset and would then be released of all obligations. Nevertheless, if the defendant says: "It belongs to you, but you owe me this-and-this," he must take an oath while holding a sacred object. Afterwards, he collects his claim from the property in his possession, as is the law applying to all those who take oaths and collect their due.

ו

יצא לבעלים הראשונים חזקה מכליהן שנגנבו, ישבע זה בנקיטת חפץ כמה הוציא ויטול ויחזור הכלי לבעלים הראשונים כמו שבארנו בהלכות גניבה, טען אתה מכרתו לי או נתתו לי במתנה, אע"פ שיצא לו שם גניבה אם לא היה מדברים העשויין להשאיל ולהשכיר הרי זה נשבע היסת ויעמוד הכלי בידו, מכאן אתה למד לכל מי שיש לו מטלטלין בידו אע"פ שיכול לומר שלקוחין הן בידי וישבע היסת ויפטר, אם אמר שלך הן אבל חייב אתה לי כך וכך ישבע בנקיטת חפץ ואחר כך יטול כדין כל הנשבעין ונוטלין.

7

When a person has in his possession articles that were made to lend or rent out, he is allowed to maintain possession even though he acknowledged the plaintiff's ownership, telling him: "I know that this property was yours, but so-and-so sold it to me," or "... gave it to me as a present," we do not expropriate it from the defendant's possession.

The above applies even if the plaintiff brings witnesses who testify that the property was known to belong to him. The rationale is that a person is wont to sell his personal property.

ז

מי שהיו בידו דברים העשויין להשאיל ולהשכיר אע"פ שהודה ואמר לו יודע אני שהם שלך אבל פלוני מכרם לי או נתנם לי במתנה אין מוציאין אותן מידו, אפילו הביא זה עדים שהיו ידועין לו שאדם עשוי למכור את כליו. 1

8

If, however, the plaintiff claims: "I rented it to you," or "I lent it to you," we expropriate it from his possession. If the object in question was not one that was made to lend or rent out, the defendant may retain possession of the article. He must, however, take a sh'vuat hesset that the plaintiff) did not lend or rent the article to him, but that he purchased it from so-and-so.

ח

טען זה עליו ואמר שאני השכרתים לך או השאלתים לך מוציאין אותן מידו, ואם היו מדברים שאינן עשויין להשאיל ולהשכיר הרי זה נשבע היסת שלא השאיל לו ולא השכיר לו אלא מפלוני לקח ויעמיד כליו בידו.

9

Do not err and interpret the phrase "entities made to lend out or rent out" as meaning "entities that are wont to be lent out or rented out" as did many, [including great sages. For all articles are fit to be lent out and are wont to be lent out. Even a person's cloak, mattress, and bed are fit to be lent out.

The phrase "articles made to lend out or rent out," by contrast, refers to utensils that people in that country make initially with the intent that they be lent out or rented out, so that they can receive a fee for them. They are considered to belong to their owners like landed property, concerning which benefit is derived from its produce, but the land itself remains. Similarly, these utensils are made primarily to benefit from renting them out - e.g., large brass pots used for cooking at party halls, bronze jewelry inlaid with gold that are rented for brides to wear. Such articles are not made to be sold, nor for the owner to use them in his own home. Instead, they are lent out to others with the expectation of receiving benefit in recompense or of renting them out for a fee.

Similarly, if a person has ordinary utensils, but there are witnesses who will testify that he rents them out at all times and lends them, and it is an accepted presumption that he lends them and rents them, they are considered utensils that were made for the sake of being lent or rented.

ט

אל תטעה בין דברים העשויין להשאיל ולהשכיר לדברים שדרכן להשאיל ולהשכיר כמו שטעו רבים וגדולים שכל הדברים ראויין להשאיל ודרכן להשאיל אפילו חלוקו של אדם ומצעו ומטתו ראויין להשאיל, אבל דברים העשויין להשאיל ולהשכיר הם הכלים שבני אותה מדינה עושין אותן מתחלת עשייתן כדי להשאילן ולהשכירן וליטול שכרן והרי הן לבעליהן, כמו קרקע שאוכל פירותיה והגוף קיים כך אלו הכלים עיקר עשייתן כדי ליהנות בשכרן, כגון היורות הגדולות של נחשת שמבשלין בהן בבית המשתאות, וכגון כלי נחשת הטוח בזהב ששוכרין אותו לכלה להתקשט בו, שעשיית אלו הכלים אינן למכירת עצמן ולא להשתמש בהן בעל הבית בביתו אלא להשאילן לאחרים כדי ליהנות כנגדן או להשכירן וליטול שכרן, וכן אם היה לאדם משאר הכלים ויש לו עדים שהוא משכירו תמיד ומשאילו והוחזק לו שהוא להשאיל ולהשכיר הרי הן ככלים העשויין להשאיל ולהשכיר.

10

When the possible damage to an article is greater than the fee one would receive for renting it out, and people are therefore careful not to lend such articles - e.g., a ritual slaughterer's knife - it is an accepted presumption that it was not made with the intent of being lent or rented out. Therefore, even if people came and testified that a person lent out or rented out such an article on several occasions, their testimony does not negate this presumption, and these utensils are considered to be all other utensils.

Proof of this position can be brought from the fact that Ravva expropriated tailor's scissors used to make a cloak, and an Aggadah scroll as articles that were made to be lent or rented out. Had it not been clarified to him through the testimony of witnesses that these were entities that were lent out, he would not have expropriated them from the orphans. It is evident that other scissors and other scrolls are not placed in this category even though they could be lent or rented out.

This concept is a fundamental principle of law and a point of logic that may be relied upon in judgment. It is clear to those who give forth knowledge. It is appropriate for a judge to keep it in mind at all times and not to sway from it.

י

וכלי שהפסדו מרובה משכרו ובני אדם מקפידין עליו שלא ישאילוהו הרי הוא בחזקת שאינו עשוי להשאיל ולהשכיר כגון סכין של שחיטה, לפיכך אפילו באו בני אדם והעידו שהשאילו או השכירו זה אין מבטלין בהן חזקתן אלא הרי הן ככל הכלים, ראיה לדברינו שהרי רבא הוציא זוג שעושין בו הסרבל וספר הגדה בדברים העשויין להשאיל ולהשכיר, ולולי שנתברר לו בעדים שהן מדברים העשויים להשאיל לא הוציא מתחת ידי יתומים, הא שאר הזוגות ושאר הספרים אינן בכלל דין זה אע"פ שהן ראויין להשאיל ולהשכיר, ודבר זה עיקר גדול בדין והוא דבר של טעם שראוי לסמוך עליו ולדון בו וברור הוא למוצאי דעת וראוי לדיין לשום אותו לנגד עיניו ולא ילוז. 2