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Kagan, R. Israel Meir HaCohen ("Chafetz Chaim")

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Kagan, R. Israel Meir HaCohen ("Chafetz Chaim"): 1838-1933; important rabbinical figure of the European Jewish community before World War II; author of Chafetz Chaim (a work on the evils of slander), after which he is called, and the Mishnah Brurah (a codification of Jewish law); lived in Radin, Poland.
Rabbi Israel Meir Kagan (1839-1933) was a Talmudist, rabbi and decisor of Jewish law based in the town of Radin (today Radun', Belarus).
"אשה כי תזריע וילדה זכר" “When a woman conceives and gives birth to a male.” (12:2) QUESTION: Parshat Shemini concludes with the topic of kosher and non-kosher foods. What is the connection between the end of Parshat Shemini and the beginning of Tazria, w...
Jacob's declaration -- "I sojourned with Laban, but did not learn from his evil ways" -- should not be understood as a boast but rather as a lament. Jacob is bemoaning the fact that he did not learn to do good the way Laban did evil...
1933
Elul 24 is the yahrtzeit of the revered Torah scholar, pietist and Jewish leader Rabbi Yisrael Meir Kagan (1838-1933) of Radin (Poland), author of Chafetz Chaim (a work on the evils of gossip and slander and the guidelines of proper speech) and Mishnah Be...
The rabbi interrupted the narrative and said, "I don't know what the Chafetz Chaim said to that student. I only know that they were together for a few minutes. I would give anything to know what he said to the boy..."
A few hours later, Avraham Simcha noticed a silhouette occupying the small, front window.
Tracing the origins of campaigns championing the imminent arrival of Moshicah, from the passionate activities of the Chofetz Chaim through the popularization via Chabad and the ensuing tensions.
Halakhah refers to Jewish law. Per its literal translation, “the way,” halachah guides the day-to-day life of a Jew.
Life Lessons from Parshat Metzora
The biblical skin discoloring of tzaraat was a consequence of spiritual failing, primarily due to lashon hara or gossip. Our words have extraordinary, far-reaching impact.
Lethal Words
Words carry the potential of causing catastrophic harm, often tearing asunder families and friendships. The destructive power of negative speech is surpassed only by the beneficial power of positive speech . . .
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