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Jacob

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Jacob: (a) (1653-1506 BCE) Third of the Patriarchs, son of Rebecca and Isaac. A studious man, he incurred his twin brother Esau’s wrath when he deceptively received Isaac’s blessings. He fled to Padan Aram where he married Leah and Rachel. He fathered the Twelve Tribes and Dinah. He returned to Canaan but lived his final years in Egypt, where he went to be with his son Joseph, viceroy of Egypt. He’s buried in the Cave of Machpelah in Hebron. (b) A common Jewish name.
Among the Three Patriarchs of our people, Jacob (Yaakov) takes a special place. He was the "favorite" of our Patriarch, our Sages say (Ber. Rabba 76). When G-d named him "Israel," after he wrestled successfully with the angel, "Israel" became the name of ...
Jacob (Yaakov in Hebrew) was the third and final of the Jewish Patriarchs. Jacob lived in the Land of Canaan, Haran, and Egypt. Unlike Abraham and Isaac, Jacob’s entire family remained righteous—his 12 sons became the 12 tribes of Israel, the Shevatim. Th...
The Kabbalists see Esau and Jacob as the embodiments of the primordial world of Tohu (“Chaos”) and our present reality-process of Tikkun (“correction”)
Ishmael's mother was the Egyptian Hagar, while Isaac was born to the righteous Sarah. But Jacob and Esau were twins; what explain their divergent characters?
Parshah Vayechi
The Sages of the Talmud, in their debate whether one may discuss Torah while consuming a meal, address the existential quandary of whether it is better to transcend nature or conform to it. (Based on Likutei Sichos, Vol 35. Vayechi 3.)
Thirty days before death, a person's Tzelem/image is removed from him and his shadow no longer appears.
Thirty days before death, a person's Tzelem/image is removed from him and his shadow no longer appears.
A Taste of Text—Vayishlach
How to react when confronted with an opportunity that may challenge, tempt or oppose your beliefs or goals . . .
A Taste of Text—Toldot
A child shouldn’t be expected to be a miniature replica of his parent. Individual character traits need to be honed and channeled.
Esau is born red and as hairy as an adult, and so he remains—red, intense, driven, violent. Jacob is born with his issues as well. Timid, a bookworm, Mama’s boy. Yet he is willing to acknowledge and confront Esau...
Does Judaism truly have something to say about every aspect of our life, or are the rabbis who claim to have an opinion on everything simply intrusive and controlling? Should rabbis just stick to teaching Torah?
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