Enter your email address to get our weekly email with fresh, exciting and thoughtful content that will enrich your inbox and your life.
To view Shabbat Times click here to set your location

Monday, December 7, 2020

Halachic Times (Zmanim)
To view Halachic Times click here to set your location
Jewish History

On Kislev 21 of the year 3448 from creation (313 BCE), there occurred the historic meeting between Shimon HaTzaddik and Alexander ('the Great") of Macedonia.

The Samarians, bitter enemies of the Jews, had convinced Alexander that the Jews' refusal to place his image in their Temple was a sign of rebellion against his sovereignty, and that the Holy Temple should be destroyed. The Kohen Gadol ("High Priest") at the time was Shimon HaTzaddik, the last of the "Men of the Great Assembly" who rebuilt the Holy Temple and revitalized Judaism under Ezra. On the 21st of Kislev Alexander marched on Jerusalem at the head of his army; Shimon, garbed in the vestments of the High Priest and accompanied with a delegation of Jewish dignitaries, went forth to greet him. The two groups walked towards each other all night; at the crack of dawn they met. As Alexander beheld the visage of the High Priest, he dismounted his horse and bowed respectfully; to his men he explained that he often had visions of a similar-looking man leading him into battle. Shimon HaTzaddik brought the emperor to the Holy Temple and explained that Judaism prohibits the display of any graven image; he offered to name all the male children born to priests that year "Alexander" as a demonstration of loyalty to the emperor (which is how "Alexander" became a common Jewish name). The Samarians plot was rebuffed, and Kislev 21 was declared a holiday. (Talmud Yoma 69a)

According to an alternative version, this episode occurred on the 25th of Tevet.

The Satmar Rebbe, Rabbi Joel Teitelbaum (1887-1979), was rescued from the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, along with 1,368 other Jews, through the efforts of Rudulf Kastner, head of the Zionist rescue operation in Hungary (an earlier transport of 1,686 Jews had been rescued on Av 29). The Satmar community celebrates the 21st of Kislev as a day of thanksgiving.

Daily Thought

To an astrobiologist:

A black hole was once a fiery sun. But then its fire went out. Eventually, it collapsed upon itself, rendering it a mass of tremendous density.

And now, a star that once shone brightly holds its light within, even pulling in any surrounding light. In the place of light, a star now creates darkness.

A person, too, may end up a black hole. Someone who is meant to shine and teach others—but has burned out and collapsed inward, absorbed in his own self. Now, rather than shining light for others, he absorbs all energy that passes his way, causing a greater and greater darkness.

We live in times when every one of us can be as brilliant as the sun. The universe has enough black holes. If you have light, shine forth.

Watch Prof. Greene tell the whole story in JEM’s documentaryThe Honest Truth