An updated story featuring live coverage of the unveiling of plans by Moshe Holtzberg and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Mumbai, India, on Jan. 18 can be read here.

Moshe Holtzberg is returning to India with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu this week after almost 10 years to help unveil plans for a state-of-the-art Living Memorial in honor of his parents: Chabad-Lubavitch emissaries Rabbi Gavriel and Rivka Holtzberg, who were murdered by terrorists in attacks that swept through Mumbai in November 2008.

At a Jan. 18 ceremony, the 11-year-old yeshivah student will join Netanyahu, who will unveil a plaque honoring Moshe’s parents at Nariman House, the building in the bustling Colaba district of India’s largest city that houses the Chabad center. The plaque will serve as the cornerstone for the Living Memorial.

Designed to educate and inspire people of all backgrounds to act for the betterment of themselves, their communities and the world, the Living Memorial will include the apartment where the Holtzbergs lived, as well as the floor where most of the murders occurred. On the top floor, where the sites of the other terror attacks that swept through Mumbai are visible, a reflection garden will recognize all the victims of the attacks.

“Inspired by the universal teachings of the Rebbe—Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson, of righteous memory—the Living Memorial is designed to show how every individual has the ability and responsibility to make the world a better place,” said Rabbi Israel Kozlovsky, co-director with his wife, Chaya, of Chabad-Lubavitch of Mumbai.

Since arriving in 2012, the Kozlovskys, based out of a small house in Mumbai, set out to re-establish Chabad’s activities and services in the region to its pre-2008 levels and rebuild Nariman House, which remained in disrepair following the brutal attack and subsequent Indian commando raid. Amid much celebration, Chabad of Mumbai formally reopened Nariman House in 2014.

The property of the Chabad India Trust, it serves as the nerve center for Chabad’s work in the city, and a home away from home for local members of the community and visitors from around the world.

The Living Memorial will honor Moshe's parents, Chabad-Lubavitch emissaries Rabbi Gabi and Rivky Holtzberg, who were murdered by terrorists in November 2008.
The Living Memorial will honor Moshe's parents, Chabad-Lubavitch emissaries Rabbi Gabi and Rivky Holtzberg, who were murdered by terrorists in November 2008.

Moshe was invited to visit his former home by Indian Prime Minister Narenda Modi during the premier’s maiden visit to Israel in July. It was then that Netanyahu invited the boy to join him on this trip to India, the first by an Israeli prime minister in 15 years.

Moshe has been living in Israel with his maternal grandparents since the tragedy, which took place on Nov. 26, 2008, a day remembered in India as 26/11. Just 2 years old at the time of the attack, he was brought to safety by his Indian nanny, Sandra Samuel, who also resides in Israel and continues to remain close with her former charge. She will be accompanying Moshe on this first visit back to his former home. Moshe’s financial well-being has been ensured through a fund established by Chabad-Lubavitch and will see him into adulthood.

Rabbi Moshe Kotlarsky, vice chairman of Merkos L’Inyonei Chinuch, the educational arm of the Chabad-Lubavitch movement, said “it is very emotional for me personally, and an inspiration for all of us, to see Moshe come back to an active Chabad House serving the community the way his parents would have wanted and ultimately gave their lives for. We look forward to continue seeing ‘Baby’ Moshe grow into the fine young man his parents would so very much want him to be.”

Netanyahu and his wife, Sara, are scheduled to be received at the Chabad House by the Kozlovskys on Jan. 18 at 1 p.m. They will be joined by Moshe’s grandparents, as well as Samuel, who is also making the trip back home.

Rabbi Yisroel Kozlovsky at the reopening of Chabad of Mumbai’s headquarters, also known as Nariman House.
Rabbi Yisroel Kozlovsky at the reopening of Chabad of Mumbai’s headquarters, also known as Nariman House.
Following the 2008 attacks, the Chabad House was little more than a bullet-ridden shell.
Following the 2008 attacks, the Chabad House was little more than a bullet-ridden shell.
Moshe Holtzberg thanks Sandra Samuel, second from right, for saving his life as Prime Minister Narendi Modi of India and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel look on. Joining them are Moshe's maternal grandmother, Yehudit Rosenberg, and his paternal grandfather, Rabbi Nachman Holtzberg, right. (Photo: AFP Photo/Pool/Atef Safadi)
Moshe Holtzberg thanks Sandra Samuel, second from right, for saving his life as Prime Minister Narendi Modi of India and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel look on. Joining them are Moshe's maternal grandmother, Yehudit Rosenberg, and his paternal grandfather, Rabbi Nachman Holtzberg, right. (Photo: AFP Photo/Pool/Atef Safadi)