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Why the Rebbetzin Pawned Her Pearls

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Why the Rebbetzin Pawned Her Pearls

Rabbi Shmuel of Lubavitch would travel extensively to advocate for his fellow Jews. He would often return to a surprise.
Charity, Rebbetzin Rivkah, R. Shmuel of Lubavitch, Lubavitcher Rebbe
Why the Rebbetzin Pawned Her Pearls
Disc 192, Program 765

Event Date: 13 Tishrei 5744 - September 20, 1983

Rabbi Shmuel of Lubavitch, the Rebbe Maharash, would travel extensively throughout Europe and the Russian Empire to advocate for his fellow Jews in Russian lands.

Whenever he returned to Lubavitch, he was faced with the task of redeeming the pearls of his wife, Rebbetzin Rivka, which she would pawn in order to give more charity in his absence!

A Jew should never pass up a chance to give more charity – he is assured that whatever he gives will ultimately come back, not just spiritually, but also materially.

Art by Rivka Korf. Rivka uses her creativity and expertise to create masterful compositions and illustrations. She shares her love of coffee with her husband, and passes on her appreciation of art and design to her children.

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Anonymous Eretz Yisroel May 8, 2019

Grabbing the Opportunity Living Torah 2019 The difference between a baseball player and one who watches the game: a team member stays till the end of the game, but a fan can leave when he sees who looks as if they will win. The Rebbe.org.
Sports have filled the airwaves for decades. At certain times in the car, right in the middle of the news on the radio, the person speaking live would be interrupted or right after the news the program director would bring on a reporter at a given sports event with late breaking news of a game. Fans waited excitedly to hear him. Was there a sudden change in the score? An "upset" maybe.
Once my father asked me, in basketball, what is the goal? How do you know? Could I really know at the age of ten or eleven?
With little time to answer, I would do my best to answer. He would interrupt and each time he said the same thing. Even though he could hit forty-footers from the top of the key (make a basket from 40 feet away), he would always answer his own question. "To pass...." to empower others. Reply

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