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Love Your Fellow As Your Fellow Needs

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Love Your Fellow As Your Fellow Needs

The mitzvah to “love your fellow as yourself” raises a dilemma. What should you do when your needs are different from your friend’s? If you are thirsty while your friend is hungry, it would be un-loving to offer him a drink instead of food. If you have time for Torah study while your friend is struggling to make ends meet, it is wrong to help him learn Torah but ignore his need for help earning a livelihood.
Unity; Oneness, Ahavat Yisrael, Lubavitcher Rebbe
Love Your Fellow As Your Fellow Needs
Disc 9, Program 36

Event Date: 10 Shevat 5743 - January 24, 1983

The mitzvah to “love your fellow as yourself” raises a dilemma. What should you do when your needs are different from your friend’s? If you are thirsty while your friend is hungry, it would be un-loving to offer him a drink instead of food. If you have time for Torah study while your friend is struggling to make ends meet, it is wrong to help him learn Torah but ignore his need for help earning a livelihood.

The primary purpose is to love in a manner which unifies both individuals together, and then, in turn, with G‑d. When you complement and complete each other, there is true unity. G‑d created us all, and needs us all for His plan. We achieve true unity by realizing that we all share a mission—to fulfill G‑d’s will.

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Hanna Athens June 26, 2017

I respectfully disagree. To "love your fellow as your fellow needs," is not Torah. G-d's commandment is "to love your fellow as yourself." It's an unconditional love regardless of his/her spiritual path. When "your fellow" sees your actions of love he/she will be inspired by you and only then will the world become a better place. Reply

Hanna Athens June 21, 2017

"To love your fellow as yourself" also means to love your neighbor who might not always be Jewish. How do you love your neighbor who has read the Torah and has a different understanding than you who also loves the One Almighty God and tries to observe all of the Torah's commandments the best he can? Do you turn away from him because he has a different understanding or do you sit down and try to help him understand the Torah's commandments?
I believe that if we really love our fellow man then we should give him the gift of Life and teach him the Torah. Reply

Anonymous Pasadena June 24, 2017
in response to Hanna:

I agree, your non-Jewish fellow may find the discussion enlightening and useful. On the other hand, be prepared to receive new insights into your neighbor's faith as well. The different experiences one has with their religion can be broadening and, useful in helping one to weather many of life's challenges. Enjoy the road to discovery. Reply

Hanna Athens June 26, 2017
in response to Anonymous:

I am referring to someone who has studied the Torah and has left his/her religion and who is sincerely looking for spiritual help without giving insights into his/her faith.

The Almighty G-d accepted the mixed multitude that went out with the Israelites. He never gave them any separate commandments ( the Seven Noahide Laws) but commanded, " one law shall there be for the native and the proselyte who lives among you."

"and your proselyte who is in the midst of your camp from the hewer of your wood to the drawer of your water, for you to pass into the covenant of Hashem your God..." Reply

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