Rabbi Yehudah Liebush Heber and his family were very close to the Rebbe and the Rebbetzin during World War II, when the couple lived anonymously in Paris.

“At the beginning of the war,” related Rabbi Heber, “I was deliberating whether to stay in Paris or to try to immigrate to the States. This was before the Nazi invasion of Paris, and no one could predict how devastating the future would be. I was financially secure in Paris and concerned about the uncertainty and difficulty of immigration.”


"You don't know what a Rebbe is," the Rebbe's son-in-law said to me. "The letter need not be delivered in order for the Rebbe to know the question. And the Rebbe's response need not arrive in order for you to receive your answer..."
The Rebbe suggested that I consult with his father-in-law, the Previous Rebbe, who was living in Poland.

“I was very surprised by this advice. Contact with Warsaw was virtually impossible by phone or mail. 'Send a telegram,' the Rebbe suggested. This also seemed futile, because telegrams were not being delivered either.

“ ‘You have no idea,’ the Rebbe said, ‘what a Rebbe is. The letter and the telegram need not be delivered in order for the Rebbe to know the question. And the Rebbe’s response need not arrive in order for you to receive your answer.’

“I promptly sat down to phrase my question and proceeded to the Western Union office. ‘Sorry, there is absolutely no possibility of telegraphing Poland,’ said the clerk. ‘All the lines are down.’ I did not really expect otherwise, but I had done what I could.

“The next morning I awoke with a sudden clarity. Despite my previous hesitations, I suddenly felt very adamant about leaving Paris and immigrating to the States.”

Rabbi Heber arrived in the States in 1940, a few months before the Rebbe. His family maintained a close relationship with the Rebbe and the Rebbetzin for many years to follow.