Introduction

There are times when a sichah focuses on an obvious anomaly in the Torah’s text, clarifying a question in the Torah’s wording or a sequence that cries out for explanation. Other sichos communicate a thought-provoking Chassidic insight that provides a deeper understanding of a well-known subject. And there are times, like the sichah to follow, where both of these objectives are achieved in a single work.

The Torah begins describing the preparations for the Giving of the Torah in Parshas Yisro (Shmos, ch. 19). That Torah reading (Shmos, ch. 20) continues, relating the details of the revelation at Sinai and the Giving of the Ten Commandments (Shmos 20).

The next Torah reading, Parshas Mishpatim, commences with the enumeration of the Torah’s civil laws. It goes on to describe briefly the observance of the festivals and to convey a promise of Divine assistance in the conquest of Eretz Yisrael (Shmos, ch. 21-23) Afterwards (Shmos, 24:1), the Torah seemingly returns to a description of the preparations for the Giving of the Torah.

And so the question arises: Why does the Torah depart from the chronological order when relating these passages?

In resolution, the Rebbe refers to a well-known Midrash:1

To what can the matter be likened? To a king who made a decree: the inhabitants of Rome shall not descend to Syria, and the inhabitants of Syria will not ascend to Rome.

In a similar way, when G‑d created the world, He decreed,2 “The heavens are the heavens of G‑d, and earth He has granted to man.” When He desired to give the Torah, He nullified this initial decree, saying the lower realms will ascend to the higher realms, and the higher realms will descend to the lower realms.

Thus, the Giving of the Torah accomplished two objectives: a) the revelation of G‑dliness from Above and b) the elevation of the lower realms.

The first theme began with the revelation of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Yisro and continued with the communication of the Torah’s laws at the beginning of Parshas Mishpatim. This showed how the revelation from Above permeated the everyday elements of the Jews’ worldly experience.

Afterwards, from the beginning of ch. 24 onward, the Torah begins to describe the second purpose of the Giving of the Torah, the elevation of the lower realms through the designation of the Jewish people as a holy nation. Therefore, it describes the covenant into which the Jews entered before the Giving of the Torah through their circumcision, their offering of sacrifices, and by making the commitment “We will do and we will listen.”3

The Torah reading concludes by describing G‑d’s command to Moshe to receive the Tablets on which were inscribed the Ten Commandments – “the Tablets of the Covenant.”4 This theme is continued in the subsequent Torah readings that describe the building of the Sanctuary as a dwelling place for G‑d on earth, as it is written, “They shall make a Sanctuary for Me and I will dwell among them,”5 and more particularly, to establish a specific resting place for the Divine presence, the Ark, as it is written,6 “I will commune [with you there.”]

It is through the syntheses of these two objectives that the Jews fulfill the ultimate Divine purpose in Creation – the establishment of a dwelling for Him in this material realm.7

Parshah / Chapters Subject Matter Date According to Rashi Date According to Ramban
Yisro - Ch. 19-20 The preparations for the Giving of the Torah, the revelation at Sinai, the commandments given in its aftermath, including commandments regarding the altar Sivan 1 to Sivan 6 (or 7)8 Sivan 1 to Sivan 6
Mishpatim - Ch. 21-23 Civil laws, the promise of Eretz Yisrael Sivan 7 to Tammuz 17 Sivan 6
Mishpatim - Ch. 24:1-11 The establishment of a covenant between the Jews and G‑d9 Sivan 4-5 Sivan 6-7
Mishpatim - Ch. 24:11-18 Moshe’s ascent to Mt. Sinai to receive the Tablets Sivan 710 Sivan 7

A Question of Chronology

1. At the conclusion of this week’s Torah reading – after the passage containing many laws governing civil matters11 and the passage relating that G‑d told Moshe, “Behold, I am sending an angel…”12 – the Torah retells the story of the revelation at Mount Sinai, beginning,13 “And to Moshe, He said, ‘Ascend to G‑d….’ ”

א

בְּסִיּוּם הַסִּדְרָה – נָאךְ דֶעם ווִי דִי תּוֹרָה פַארְעֶנְדִיקְט "פַּרְשַׁת דִּינִין"89 (אוּן דִי פַּרְשָׁה "הִנֵּה אָנֹכִי שׁוֹלֵחַ מַלְאָךְ גו׳"90) – דֶערְצֵיילְט דִי תּוֹרָה91: "וְאֶל מֹשֶׁה אָמַר עֲלֵה אֶל ה׳ גו׳".

Commenting on the words, “And to Moshe, He said, ‘Ascend…,’ ” Rashi explains that: “This passage was related before the Ten Commandments were given. On the fourth of Sivan, G‑d told Moshe, ‘Ascend…,’ ” i.e., this passage is not related in chronological order.

שְׁטֶעלְט זִיךְ רַשִׁ״י אוֹיף דִי ווֶערְטֶער "וְאֶל מֹשֶׁה אָמַר עֲלֵה" אוּן אִיז מְפָרֵשׁ: "פַּרְשָׁה זוֹ נֶאֶמְרָה קוֹדֶם עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת וּבְד׳ בְּסִיוָן נֶאֶמְרָה לוֹ עֲלֵה". דָאס הֵייסְט אַז דִי פַּרְשָׁה שְׁטֵייט דָא שֶׁלֹּא בִּמְקוֹמָהּ.

Many of the commentators14 who interpret the Torah according to its straightforward meaning understand the sequence otherwise, maintaining that the passages are related in chronological order. According to these commentators, this passage was related after the Giving of the Torah and describes Moshe’s ascent to G‑d after the Giving of the Torah, when he stayed on Mount Sinai for 40 days and nights. Nevertheless, some of the commentaries explain that, according to the straightforward understanding of the Torah,15Rashi and others16 were compelled to posit that “This passage was related before the Ten Commandments were given,”17 because:

דֶער הֶכְרַח אִין פְּשׁוּטוֹ שֶׁל מִקְרָא92 צוּ זָאגְן אַז "פַּרְשָׁה זוֹ נֶאֶמְרָה קוֹדֶם עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת"93 – אוּן נִיט (ווִי עֶס לֶערְנֶען כַּמָּה וְכַמָּה פַּשְׁטָנֵי הַמִּקְרָא94) אַז דִי פַּרְשָׁה אִיז גֶעזָאגְט גֶעווָארְן (בִּמְקוֹמָהּ) נָאךְ מַתַּן תּוֹרָה אוּן זִי רֶעדט ווֶעגְן עֲלִיַּית מֹשֶׁה אֶל ה׳ נָאךְ מַתַּן תּוֹרָה – אִיז95, ווִי מְפָרְשִׁים זָאגְן:

a) The wording of the verse, “And to Moshe, He said, ‘Ascend to G‑d…’ ” rather than “G‑d told Moshe, ‘Ascend…,’” as is common in many other places, implies that it is not describing the beginning of a new event, but was “related before the passages immediately preceding it,” i.e., it was the continuation of a story begun beforehand.18

(א) פוּן לָשׁוֹן הַכָּתוּב96 – "וְאֶל מֹשֶׁה אָמַר עֲלֵה אֶל ה׳", נִיט "וַיֹּאמֶר ה׳ אֶל מֹשֶׁה כְּמִנְהַג הַכָּתוּב בִּשְׁאָר הַמְּקוֹמוֹת" – אִיז מַשְׁמַע, אַז "אָמַר כְּבָר קוֹדֶם אֵלּוּ הַפַּרְשִׁיּוֹת דִּלְעֵיל".

b) The passage’s content – the description of the covenant into which our ancestors entered with G‑d19 – is a matter that logic dictates was accomplished before receiving the Torah and in preparation for it.20

(ב) פוּן תּוֹכֶן הַפַּרְשָׁה97 – דֶער עִנְיָן פוּן "נִכְנְסוּ אֲבוֹתֵינוּ לִבְרִית"98, ווָאס ווֶערְט דֶערְצֵיילְט אִין דֶער פַּרְשָׁה, אִיז אַ זַאךְ ווָאס דֶער שֵׂכֶל אִיז מְחַיֵיב אַז מֶען הָאט עֶס גֶעטָאן אֵיידֶער מֶען הָאט בַּאקוּמֶען דִי תּוֹרָה אַלְס הֲכָנָה דֶערְצוּ.

Nevertheless, clarification is still required: Although here and in a number of places Rashi21 states the general principle, “There is no sequence of earlier and later events in the Torah,” nevertheless, it is self-evident that this principle is applied only when there is no other alternative, and that there must be a reason for the deviation from the chronological order.22 For example, after explaining in his commentary on the verse,23 “And Terach died in Charan…,” that Terach died after Avram left Charan,24 Rashi asks:25 “Why did Scripture tell of Terach’s death before speaking of Avram’s departure?”

עֶס אִיז אָבֶּער שְׁווֶער: אַף עַל פִּי אַז רַשִׁ״י בְּרֶענְגְט (וּבְכַמָּה מְקוֹמוֹת) דֶעם כְּלַל99 אַז "אֵין מוּקְדָּם וּמְאוּחָר בַּתּוֹרָה", אִיז אָבֶּער פַארְשְׁטַאנְדִיק, אַז מֶען זָאגְט דָאס נָאר – וואוּ סְ׳אִיז נִיטָא קֵיין בְּרֵירָה, אוּן אַז עֶס דַארְף זַיְין עֶפֶּעס אַ טַעַם אוֹיף דֶעם שִׁינּוּי הַסֵּדֶר100. אוּן ווִי מֶען גֶעפִינְט אִין פֵּירוּשׁ רַשִׁ״י וּלְדוּגְמָא אוֹיפְן פָּסוּק101 "וַיָּמָת תֶּרַח בְּחָרָן", אַז נָאךְ דֶעם ווִי רַשִׁ״י אִיז מְבַאֵר אַז מִיתַת תֶּרַח אִיז גֶעווֶען "לְאַחַר שֶׁיָּצָא אַבְרָם מֵחָרָן וכו׳"102, אִיז עֶר מַמְשִׁיךְ וּמַקְשֶׁה103 – "וְלָמָּה הִקְדִּים הַכָּתוּב מִיתָתוֹ שֶׁל תֶּרַח לִיצִיאָתוֹ שֶׁל אַבְרָם כו׳".

Explanation is similarly necessary regarding the matter at hand: Why is the passage, “And to Moshe, He said, ‘Ascend…’ ” – which was actually related on the fourth of Sivan before the giving of the Ten Commandments – mentioned out of chronological sequence, only at the end of Parshas Mishpatim?26

דַארְף מֶען פַארְשְׁטֵיין בְּנִדּוֹן דִּידַן: פַארְווָאס זָאל דִי פַּרְשָׁה "וְאֶל מֹשֶׁה אָמַר עֲלֵה״ – ווָאס אִיז גֶעזָאגְט גֶעווָארְן ״קוֹדֶם עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת וּבְד׳ בְּסִיוַן״ – שְׁטֵיין שֶׁלּא בִּמְקוֹמָהּ, עֶרְשְׁט בְּסוֹף פַּרְשַׁת מִשְׁפָּטִים104?

In particular, the question is germane here, because according to this explanation the sequence of the story of the Giving of the Torah and the preparations for it is very problematic.27 Parshas Yisro describes the preparations for the Giving of the Torah carried out on “the second day”28 (the second of Sivan), “the third day,”29 and some of those of “the fourth of the month,”30 including G‑d’s command to refrain from intimacy and set borders around Mount Sinai,31 as it is written,32 “He sanctified the people… and he told the people, ‘Be prepared… do not approach a woman.” Parshas Yisro then describes the Giving of the Torah on the sixth (or seventh)33 of the month and concludes with G‑d’s statements to Moshe delivered afterwards.34

וּבִפְרַט, אַז לוֹיט דֶעם קוּמְט אוֹיס אַז דֶער הֶמְשֵׁךְ הַסִּיפּוּר ווֶעגְן מַתַּן תּוֹרָה וַהֲכָנוֹת לְזֶה אִיז לִכְאוֹרָה בְּאוֹפֶן תָּמוּהַּ מְאֹד105:

אִין פַּרְשַׁת יִתְרוֹ ווֶערְט דֶערְצֵיילְט ווֶעגְן דִי הֲכָנוֹת צוּ מַתַּן תּוֹרָה פוּן "יוֹם הַשֵּׁנִי"106 (ב׳ סִיוָן), פוּן "יוֹם שְׁלִישִׁי"107, אוּן אַ טֵייל פוּן "רְבִיעִי לַחוֹדֶשׁ"108 (כּוֹלֵל – דֶער צִיווּי ה׳ אוֹיף "פְּרִישָׁה וְהַגְבָּלָה"109: וַיְקַדֵּשׁ אֶת הָעָם גו׳ וַיֹּאמֶר אֶל הָעָם הֱיוּ נְכוֹנִים גו׳ אַל תִּגְּשׁוּ גו׳110), אוּן דֶערְנָאךְ – ווֶעגְן מַתַּן תּוֹרָה בְּיוֹם שִׁשָּׁה (אוֹ שְׁבִיעִי)111בַּחוֹדֶשׁ; אוּן ווֶעגְן אֲמִירַת ה׳ צוּ מֹשֶׁה׳ן נָאכְדֶעם112.

After including several chapters that focus on the Torah’s civil laws and other subjects, at the end of Parshas Mishpatim the Torah backtracks and, according to Rashi,21 refers to the events of the fourth of Sivan – that Moshe told the Jews the command to refrain from intimacy, set borders around Mount Sinai,35 and “all the laws,” i.e., the Seven Universal Laws Commanded to Noach and his Descendants, the laws of Shabbos, and other commandments given to them at Marah25 – and it also refers to the events of the fifth36 of Sivan.

אוּן אִין סוֹף פַּרְשַׁת מִשְׁפָּטִים קֶערְט זִיךְ אוּם דִי תּוֹרָה צוּרִיק צוּ מְאוֹרָעוֹת פוּן ד׳ סִיוָן [אַז מֹשֶׁה הָאט דֶערְצֵיילְט אִידְן "מִצְוַת פְּרִישָׁה וְהַגְבָּלָה"כג, אוּן "אֵת כָּל הַמִּשְׁפָּטִים – ז׳ מִצְוֹת כו׳ וְשַׁבָּת כו׳ שֶׁנִּיתְּנוּ לָהֶם בְּמָרָה"113] אוּן צוּ חֲמִשָּׁה114 בְּסִיוָן?!

Understanding the Interruptions

2. There is another point regarding the order of the passages that raises a question according to Rashi’s interpretation. The other commentators (mentioned above) maintain that the passage beginning “And to Moshe, He said, ‘Ascend…,’” was related after the Giving of the Torah, and they interpret the verse,37 “Moshe came and related to the people all the words of G‑d and all the judgments,” as referring to the judgments and laws related in this Torah reading, Parshas Mishpatim. They were conveyed to Moshe on the day of the Giving of the Torah,38 and Moshe related them to the Jews immediately thereafter.

ב

ב. נָאךְ אַ תְּמִיָּה אִין סֵדֶר הַפַּרְשִׁיּוֹת לוֹיט פֵּירוּשׁ רַשִׁ״י:

דִי פַּשְׁטָנִים הַנַ״ל (ווֶעלְכֶע לֶערְנֶען אַז דִי פַּרְשָׁה אִיז גֶעזָאגְט גֶעווָארְן נָאךְ מַתַּן תּוֹרָה) זָאגְן, אַז דָאס ווָאס עֶס שְׁטֵייט ווַיְיטֶער115 "וַיָּבֹא מֹשֶׁה וַיְסַפֵּר לָעָם אֵת כָּל דִּבְרֵי ה׳ וְאֵת כָּל הַמִּשְׁפָּטִים" בַּאצִיט זִיךְ צוּ דִי מִשְׁפָּטִים וְדִינִים פוּן דֶער סִדְרָה (פַּרְשַׁת מִשְׁפָּטִים), ווֶעלְכֶע זַיְינֶען אָנְגֶעזָאגְט גֶעווָארְן צוּ מֹשֶׁה׳ן "בּוֹ בַּיּוֹם" פוּן מַתַּן תּוֹרָה116 (אוּן מֹשֶׁה הָאט זֵיי גְלַיְיךְ דֶערְנָאךְ אִיבֶּערְגֶעגֶעבְּן צוּ אִידְן).

Rashi,39by contrast, maintains that “the statutes and judgments in the Torah reading that begins VeEleh HaMishpatim”were related to Moshe later, during the first 40 days he stayed on Mount Sinai. According to Rashi’s interpretation, the Torah interrupts between the two narratives describing the preparations for the Giving of the Torah undertaken until the fifth of Sivan, inserting not only the description of the preparations for the Giving of the Torah on the sixth of Sivan and the Giving of the Torah itself, but also many different matters that G‑d conveyed to Moshe during the following 40 days.40

אָבֶּער רַשִׁ״י בְּפֵירוּשׁוֹ עַל הַתּוֹרָה אִיז מְפָרֵשׁ117, אַז "הַחוּקִּים וְהַמִּשְׁפָּטִים שֶׁבִּוְאֵלֶּה הַמִּשְׁפָּטִים" זַיְינֶען גֶעזָאגְט גֶעווָארְן צוּ מֹשֶׁה׳ן אִין דִי אַרְבָּעִים יוֹם (הָרִאשׁוֹנִים) ווֶען עֶר אִיז גֶעווֶען בָּהָר –

וּלְפִי פֵּירוּשׁוֹ זֶה קוּמְט אוֹיס, אַז צְווִישְׁן דִי צְווֵיי סִיפּוּרִים (ווֶעגְן דִי הֲכָנוֹת (בִּיז חֲמִשָּׁה בְּסִיוָן) צוּ מַתַּן תּוֹרָה) אִיז דִי תּוֹרָה מַפְסִיק נִיט נָאר מִיט דִי הֲכָנוֹת צוּ מַתַּן תּוֹרָה פוּן שִׁשָּׁה בְּסִיוָן וּמַתַּן תּוֹרָה, נָאר אוֹיךְ מִיט פִילֶע עִנְיָנִים ווָאס דֶער אוֹיבֶּערְשְׁטֶער הָאט גֶעזָאגְט מֹשֶׁה׳ן בְּמֶשֶׁךְ אַרְבָּעִים יוֹם שֶׁלְּאַחֲרֵי זֶה118!

Furthermore, after relating all the laws and judgments detailed in Parshas Mishpatim and after the passage beginning,3 “And to Moshe, He said, ‘Ascend to G‑d…,’ ” the Torah states at the end of the reading,41 “And G‑d said to Moshe, ‘Ascend the mountain to Me and abide there, and I will give you the stone tablets…. Moshe arose… and ascended… the mountain. Moshe stayed on the mountain for 40 days and 40 nights.” As Rashi42 states, this also took place directly after the Giving of the Torah.

נָאךְ מֶער: נָאךְ דִי אַלֶע דִינִים וּמִשְׁפָּטִים (פוּן פַּרְשַׁת מִשְׁפָּטִים) אוּן נָאךְ דֶער פַּרְשָׁה "וְאֶל מֹשֶׁה אָמַר עֲלֵה אֶל ה׳" ווֶערְט בְּסִיּוּם הַסִּדְרָה דֶערְצֵיילְט119 "וַיֹּאמֶר ה׳ אֶל מֹשֶׁה עֲלֵה אֵלַי הָהָרָה וֶהְיֵה שָׁם וְאֶתְּנָה לְךָ אֶת לוּחוֹת הָאֶבֶן גו׳ . . וַיָּקָם מֹשֶׁה . . וַיַּעַל . . אֶל הָהָר וַיְהִי מֹשֶׁה בָּהָר אַרְבָּעִים יוֹם וְאַרְבָּעִים לָיְלָה". ווָאס דָאס אִיז שׁוֹין ווִידֶער גֶעווֶען (ווִי רַשִׁ״י120 זָאגְט) תֵּיכֶף "לְאַחַר מַתַּן תּוֹרָה".

Thus, according to Rashi, even the events that took place after the Giving of the Torah, i.e., Moshe’s ascent of Mount Sinai after the Giving of the Torah and his forty-day stay there are not presented in their chronological order. Instead, the narrative is interrupted with the recounting of a prior event. First, the Torah relates the statutes and laws that G‑d conveyed to Moshe during the 40 days he was on the mountain.43 Then, it makes an interruption and includes the passage that begins, “And to Moshe, He said, ‘Ascend…,’ ” which describes the preparations for the Giving of the Torah. Afterwards, the Torah continues with the command, “Ascend the mountain to Me” to receive the Tablets, and concludes by relating that Moshe carried out this command.

– קוּמְט אוֹיס (לוֹיט פֵּירוּשׁ רַשִׁ״י), אַז אוֹיךְ דֶער הֶמְשֵׁךְ הָעִנְיָנִים פוּן דֶעם זְמַן – עֲלִיַּית מֹשֶׁה לָהָר נָאךְ מַתַּן תּוֹרָה (אוּן זַיְין זַיְין דָארְט אַרְבָּעִים יוֹם) ווֶערְט אִין דֶער תּוֹרָה אִיבֶּערְגֶערִיסְן מִיט אַן עִנְיָן פוּן אַ זְמַן מוּקְדָּם: פְרִיעֶר דֶערְצֵיילְט דִי תּוֹרָה ווֶעגְן דִי חוּקִּים וּמִשְׁפָּטִים ווָאס דֶער אוֹיבֶּערְשְׁטֶער הָאט גֶעזָאגְט מֹשֶׁה׳ן אִין דִי אַרְבָּעִים יוֹם בָּהָר121, אוּן דֶערְנָאךְ (נָאכְן מַפְסִיק זַיְין מִיט דֶער פַּרְשָׁה – פוּן פַאר מַתַּן תּוֹרָה – ״וְאֶל מֹשֶׁה אָמַר עֲלֵה״) – דֶעם צִיווּי "עֲלֵה אֵלַי הָהָרָה" צוּ בַּאקוּמֶען דִי לוּחוֹת, אוּן ווִי מֹשֶׁה הָאט מְקַיֵּים גֶעווֶען דֶעם צִיווּי.

What Sinai Accomplished

3. It is possible to explain all these difficulties based on the following conception. The Giving of the Torah accomplished two transformative objectives:

a) G‑d gave the Torah – its mitzvos and laws – to the Jewish people.

b) The Jewish people’s identity underwent a metamorphosis; as a result, they became servants of G‑d, as implied by the verse,44 “You will serve G‑d on this mountain.” To use Rashi’s words,45through the Giving of the Torah, the Jews became G‑d’s subjects.

ג

וְיֵשׁ לוֹמר הַבִּיאוּר בְּזֶה:

בַּיי מַתַּן תּוֹרָה הָאבְּן זִיךְ אוֹיפְגֶעטָאן צְווֵיי עִנְיָנִים: א) דֶער אוֹיבֶּערְשְׁטֶער הָאט גֶעגֶעבְּן תּוֹרָה – דִי מִצְווֹת וְהִלְכוֹת הַתּוֹרָה – צוּ אִידְן. ב) אִידְן זַיְינֶען דוּרְךְ דֶעם גֶעווָארְן עַבְדֵי ה׳, וּכְמוֹ שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר122 "תַּעַבְדוּן אֶת הָאֱלֹקִים עַל הָהָר הַזֶּה", וּבִלְשׁוֹן רַשִׁ״י123 אַז אִידְן זַיְינֶען גֶעווָארְן "מְשׁוּעְבָּדִים לִי".

G‑d highlighted both these objectives immediately in His first words to Moshe in the Sinai Desert on the second of Sivan,46in preparation for the Giving of the Torah,47 “So shall you say to the house of Yaakov ‘You saw… and now, if you heed My voice and keep My covenant, you shall be a treasure to Me.’ ” This verse underscores that two things were asked of the Jewish people: a) “heed My voice,” i.e., to carry out G‑d’s commands, and b) “and keep My covenant,” interpreted by Rashi48to mean the covenant that “I will establish with you regarding the observance of the Torah.” The Jews’ obligation to observe the mitzvos was instituted as a covenant, binding the Jews to G‑d and making them His subjects.

אוּן דִי בֵּיידֶע פְּרָטִים הָאט דֶער אוֹיבֶּערְשְׁטֶער מַדְגִּישׁ גֶעווֶען גְלַיְיךְ אִין דֶעם עֶרְשְׁטְן דִּבּוּר צוּ מֹשֶׁה׳ן "בְּמִדְבַּר סִינַי" (בְּשֵׁנִי בְּסִיוָןיח) – "כֹּה124 תֹאמַר גו׳. אַתֶּם רְאִיתֶם גו׳ וְעַתָּה אִם שָׁמוֹעַ תִּשְׁמְעוּ בְּקוֹלִי וּשְׁמַרְתֶּם אֶת בְּרִיתִי וִהְיִיתֶם לִי סְגוּלָּה גו׳"; אַז פוּן אִידְן מָאנְט זִיךְ: (א) "שָׁמוֹעַ תִּשְׁמְעוּ בְּקוֹלִי" – אויספָאלגן די צִיווּיי ה׳. (ב) "וּשְׁמַרְתֶּם אֶת בְּרִיתִי (שֶׁאֶכְרוֹת עִמָּכֶם עַל שְׁמִירַת הַתּוֹרָה125)" – אַז דָאס אִיז אִין אַן אוֹפֶן פוּן בְּרִית. אִידְן הָאבְּן זִיךְ גֶעבּוּנְדְן מִיטְ׳ן אוֹיבֶּערְשְׁטְן, "מְשׁוּעְבָּדִים לִי".

This constitutes the difference between the two Torah readings – Parshas Yisro and Parshas Mishpatim that describe the preparations for the Giving of the Torah.

אוּן דָאס אִיז דֶער תּוֹכֶן הַחִילּוּק צְווִישְׁן דִי צְווֵיי פַּרְשִׁיוֹת (ווֶעגְן דִי הֲכָנוֹת לְמַתַּן תּוֹרָה) – פַּרְשַׁת יִתְרוֹ אוּן פַּרְשָׁתֵנוּ:

Parshas Yisro describes primarily49 the Giving of the Torah’s mitzvos, in particular, the Ten Commandments. (Similarly, “the passage concerning the altar”50that follows the Ten Commandments flows in direct sequence from the Giving of the Torah, as the verse relates,51 “You have seen that I have spoken…. Do not make images…. Make an altar of earth….”) Because of that focus, the narrative in Parshas Yisro that describes the Jews’ preparations for the Giving of the Torah speaks primarily about the commandments G‑d gave the Jews in preparation for that event – the commandments to refrain from intimacy and to set borders around Mount Sinai. The passage therefore emphasizes that G‑d had instructed Moshe regarding these commandments and, when Moshe conveyed them to the Jews, he underscored that these commandments were given to prepare for the revelation from Above.

אִין פַּרְשַׁת יִתְרוֹ רֶעדט זִיךְ (בְּעִיקָר126) ווֶעגְן נְתִינַת (מִצְוֹת) הַתּוֹרָה – עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת, [וְעַל דֶּרֶךְ זֶה ״פַּרְשַׁת מִזְבֵּחַ״127 – ווָאס אִיז אַ הֶמְשֵׁךְ יָשָׁר צוּ מַתַּן תּוֹרָה, ווִי דֶער פָּסוּק זָאגְט128 "אַתֶּם רְאִיתֶם גו׳ לֹא תַעֲשׂוּן אִתִּי גו׳ מִזְבַּח אֲדָמָה תַּעֲשֶׂה גו׳"]. אוּן דֶערִיבֶּער, אוֹיךְ אִין דֶעם סִיפּוּר הַהֲכָנוֹת צוּ מַתַּן תּוֹרָה רֶעדט זִיךְ (בְּעִיקָר) ווֶעגְן דִי מִצְווֹת ווֶעלְכֶע דֶער אוֹיבֶּערְשְׁטֶער הָאט גֶעגֶעבְּן אִידְן אַלְס הֲכָנָה צוּ מַתַּן תּוֹרָה – מִצְוַת פְּרִישָׁה וְהַגְבָּלָה [אוּן דֶערְפַאר אִיז דֶערְבַּיי מוּדְגָּשׁ ווִי דֶער אוֹיבֶּערְשְׁטֶער הָאט אָנְגֶעזָאגְט מֹשֶׁה׳ן אוֹיף דִי מִצְוֹת, וְעַל דֶּרֶךְ זֶה ווִי מֹשֶׁה הָאט זֵיי אִיבֶּערְגֶעגֶעבְּן צוּ דִי אִידְן].

By contrast, Parshas Mishpatim highlights the second dimension of the Giving of the Torah, the covenant established between G‑d and the Jews through which they became His subjects. That covenant was established through the specific activities mentioned in this passage:52 the Jews’ acceptance of the Torah, making the commitment,53 “All the words that G‑d has spoken we will do” and “We will do and we will listen,”54 the composition of the Book of the Covenant,55 building the altar, bringing sacrifices, and sprinkling the blood on the Jewish people.56 The commandments to refrain from intimacy and set borders around Mount Sinai are again alluded to here57 only because of a new dimension that is highlighted58 – that the Jews made the commitment, “We will do,” accepting G‑d’s command and expressing their willingness and obligation to carry out His word, redefining their identity by becoming G‑d’s servants.

מַה שֶׁאֵין כֵּן אִין פַּרְשַׁת מִשְׁפָּטִים רֶעדט זִיךְ ווֶעגְן דֶעם צְווֵייטְן עִנְיָן אִין מַתַּן תּוֹרָה – דֶער כְּרִיתַת בְּרִית צְווִישְׁן דֶעם אוֹיבֶּערְשְׁטן מִיט דִי אִידְן, דוּרְךְ ווֶעלְכְן אִידְן זַיְינֶען גֶעווָארְן "מְשׁוּעְבָּדִים לִי". ווָאס דָאס אִיז גֶעווָארְן דוּרְךְ דִי פְּרָטִים (פְּעוּלּוֹת) ווָאס ווֶערְן דֶערְצֵיילְט דָא129: אֲמִירַת נַעֲשֶׂה130 (אוּן נַעֲשֶׂה וְנִשְׁמָע) – דִי קַבָּלָה פוּן אִידְן, כְּתִיבַת סֵפֶר הַבְּרִית, בִּנְיַן מִזְבֵּחַ אוּן הַקְרָבַת קָרְבָּנוֹת, הַזָּאַת דָּמִים131. [אוּן אוֹיךְ דִי "מִצְוַת פְּרִישָׁה וְהַגְבָּלָה" ווָאס ווֶערְט דָא אִיבֶּערְגֶעחַזֶרְט, אִיז בִּשְׁבִיל דָּבָר שֶׁנִּתְחַדֵּשׁ בָּהּ132, דֶער פְּרַט פוּן אֲמִירַת ״נַעֲשֶׂה״ – דִי קַבָּלָה פוּן אִידְן, אַז זֵיי זַיְינֶען מוּכָן וּמְשׁוּעְבָּד צוּ אָנְנֶעמֶען אוֹיף זִיךְ "דִּבְרֵי ה׳"].

Outlining the Sequence

4. On this basis, it is possible to resolve the questions regarding the sequence of the passages and events related in these Torah readings quite straightforwardly. First, in Parshas Yisro and the first portion of Parshas Mishpatim, the Torah details the particulars relevant to the first theme of the Giving of the Torah in their entirety – conveying the Torah’s mitzvos and laws. Thus, it describes the commands that served as preparation for the Giving of the Torah (refraining from intimacy and setting the borders around Mount Sinai), the Giving of the Torah (the Ten Commandments), the passage concerning the altar, which follows directly after the Giving of the Torah, as mentioned above, and the passage beginning VeEleh HaMishpatim, “And these are the judgments,” which mentions the laws that G‑d taught Moshe during the 40 days he stayed on Mount Sinai.59

ד

דֶערְמִיט אִיז פַארְעֶנְטְפֶערְט בְּפַשְׁטוּת דֶער הֶמְשֵׁךְ סֵדֶר הַפַּרְשִׁיוֹת וְהָעִנְיָנִים אִין דִי סִדְרוֹת:

פְרִיעֶר שְׁטֵייט אִין תּוֹרָה דָאס ווָאס אִיז שַׁיָיךְ צוּם עֶרְשְׁטְן עִנְיָן אִין מַתַּן תּוֹרָה וּבִשְׁלֵימוּת – נְתִינַת מִצְווֹת וְדִינֵי הַתּוֹרָה: דִי מִצְווֹת אַלְס הֲכָנָה צוּ מַתַּן תּוֹרָה (מִצְוַת פְּרִישָׁה וְהַגְבָּלָה); מַתַּן־תּוֹרָה (עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת); "פַּרְשַׁת מִזְבֵּחַ" (ווָאס קוּמְט גְלַיְיךְ נָאךְ מַתַּן תּוֹרָה כַּנַ״ל), אוּן "וְאֵלֶּה הַמִּשְׁפָּטִים״ – דִי הִלְכוֹת הַתּוֹרָה ווָאס דֶער אוֹיבֶּערְשְׁטֶער הָאט גֶעלֶערְנְט מִיט מֹשֶׁה׳ן בָּהָר אִין דִי אַרְבָּעִים יוֹם133.

After the Torah concludes setting forth the first theme of the Giving of the Torah, it begins detailing the events and activities associated with the second theme of the Giving of the Torah,60 the establishment of the covenant.

אוּן נָאךְ דֶעם ווִי דִי תּוֹרָה פַארְעֶנְדִיקְט דֶעם עֶרְשְׁטְן עִנְיָן אִין מַתַּן תּוֹרָה, הוֹיבְּט אָן דִי תּוֹרָה מְפָרֵט זַיְין דָאס ווָאס הָאט אַ שַׁיְיכוּת צוּם צְווֵייטְן עִנְיָן אִין מַתַּן תּוֹרָה134 – דִי כְּרִיתַת בְּרִית.

This also explains why the Torah divides the narrative of Moshe ascending Mount Sinai after the Giving of the Torah at the end of Parshas Mishpatim into two parts, as discussed above.61The reason is that the 40-day period when Moshe abided on Mount Sinai also had two themes:

עַל פִּי זֶה אִיז אוֹיךְ פַארְעֶנְטְפֶערְט פַארְווָאס דִי תּוֹרָה צֶעטֵיילְט דֶעם סִיפּוּר ווֶעגְן עֲלִיַּית מֹשֶׁה בָּהָר נָאךְ מַתַּן תּוֹרָה (כַּנַ״ל סוֹף סְעִיף ב) – ווַיְיל אוֹיךְ אִין דִי אַרְבָּעִים יוֹם ווֶען מֹשֶׁה אִיז גֶעווֶען בָּהָר זַיְינֶען גֶעווֶען דִי צְווֵיי עִנְיָנִים:

a) G‑d taught Moshe “the statutes and judgments included in this Torah reading which begins with VeEleh HaMishpatim,” as mentioned above.

b) “I will give you the Tablets of Stone”62on which the Ten Commandments were engraved. The purpose of giving the Tablets was obviously not to study from them, but for them to serve as “the Tablets of Testimony63 and “the Tablets of the Covenant.”64 They served as testimony to the covenant that G‑d established with the Jewish people at the Giving of the Torah and the Jew’s commitment to observe it.

(א) דֶער אוֹיבֶּערְשְׁטֶער הָאט גֶעלֶערְנְט מִיט מֹשֶׁה׳ן "הַחוּקִּים וְהַמִּשְׁפָּטִים שֶׁבִּוְאֵלֶּה הַמִּשְׁפָּטִים" (כַּנַ״ל). (ב) "וְאֶתְּנָה לְךָ אֶת לוּחוֹת הָאֶבֶן גו׳ "135, ווָאס דִי מַטָּרָה פוּן נְתִינַת הַלּוּחוֹת אִיז בְּפַשְׁטוּת (נִיט בִּכְדֵי צוּ לֶערְנֶען אִין זֵיי, נָאר) דָאס ווָאס זֵיי זַיְינֶען "לוּחוֹת הָעֵדוּת"136, "לוּחוֹת הַבְּרִית"137: זֵיי דִינֶען ווִי אַן עֵדוּת אוֹיף דֶער בְּרִית ווָאס דֶער אוֹיבֶּערְשְׁטֶער הָאט כּוֹרֵת גֶעווֶען מִיט אִידְן בְּמַתַּן תּוֹרָה (אוֹיף שְׁמִירַת הַתּוֹרָה).

On this basis, it can be understood why the passage that describes the first theme of Moshe’s 40 days on Sinai, i.e., when he received the laws beginning, VeEleh HaMishpatim, “And these are the judgments,” is related in sequence with the Ten Commandments and the passage concerning the altar, while the charge, “Ascend the mountain to Me… and I will give you the Tablets of Stone,” is mentioned in connection with the second theme of the Giving of the Torah, the establishment of the covenant.

אוּן דֶערְמִיט אִיז מוּבָן ווָאס דֶער עֶרְשְׁטֶער עִנְיָן הַנַ״ל (אִין דִי אַרְבָּעִים יוֹם) – וְאֵלֶּה הַמִּשְׁפָּטִים גו׳ – ווֶערְט דֶערְצֵיילְט בְּהֶמְשֵׁךְ צוּ דִי עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת וּפַרְשַׁת מִזְבֵּחַ; אוּן דֶער עִנְיָן פוּן "עֲלֵה אֵלַי הָהָרָה גו׳ וְאֶתְּנָה לְךָ אֶת לוּחוֹת הָאֶבֶן גו׳" – בְּשַׁיְיכוּת צוּם צְווֵייטְן עִנְיָן אִין מַתַּן תּוֹרָה (דִי כְּרִיתַת בְּרִית).

The Beginning of a New Motif

5. It is possible to say that this distinction is underscored by Rashi in the precise wording he chooses, “And to Moshe, He said, ‘Ascend…’ – This passage was related before the Ten Commandments were given.

Two questions arise:

ה

וְיֵשׁ לוֹמַר, אַז דֶעם חִילּוּק הַנַ״ל דַיְיטֶעט רַשִׁ״י אָן בְּדִיּוּק לְשׁוֹנוֹ – "וְאֶל מֹשֶׁה אָמַר עֲלֵה, פַּרְשָׁה זוֹ נֶאֶמְרָה קוֹדֶם עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת", דְּלִכְאוֹרָה:

a) Why does Rashi include the word “ascend” in the heading of this commentary? On the surface, it would have been sufficient to cite the words “And to Moshe, He said…,” or even just “And to Moshe…,” since Rashi continues, “This passage was related….”65

(א) פַארְווָאס אִיז רַשִׁ״י מַעְתִּיק אִין דֶעם דִּיבּוּר־הַמַּתְחִיל אוֹיךְ דֶעם ווָארְט "עֲלֵה"? עֶס ווָאלְט לִכְאוֹרָה גֶעווֶען גֶענוּג צוּ מַעְתִּיק זַיְין "וְאֶל מֹשֶׁה אָמַר" (אָדֶער נָאר – ״וְאֶל מֹשֶׁה״ – ווִיבַּאלְד עֶר אִיז מַמְשִׁיךְ "פַּרְשָׁה זוֹ", אוּן "נֶאֶמְרָה")?

b) Why does Rashi use the words “before the ‘Ten Commandments’ ”66 and not “before the Giving of the Torah”? Moreover, in his commentary to the Talmud,67 Rashi does, in fact, use that phrase in his comment beginning, “And to Moshe, He said….” There, he states that this passage “was related before the Giving of the Torah.”

(ב) ווָאס אִיז דֶער טַעַם ווָאס עֶר נוּצְט דֶעם לָשׁוֹן "קוֹדֶם עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת" אוּן נִיט "קוֹדֶם מַתַּן תּוֹרָה"138? נָאךְ מֶער: בְּפֵירוּשׁוֹ עַל הַשַׁ״ס139 זָאגְט טַאקֶע רַשִׁ״י דֶעם לָשׁוֹן ״וְאֶל מֹשֶׁה אָמַר עֲלֵה וגו׳ . . קוֹדֶם מַתַּן תּוֹרָה נֶאֶמְרָה".

These two questions become even more pronounced when the wording Rashi uses in the explanation of this verse is compared with the wording he uses in explanation of the subsequent verse,50 “And G‑d said to Moshe, ‘Ascend the mountain to Me.’ ” Rashi interprets that verse, “And G‑d said to Moshe – after the Giving of the Torah.” In this commentary, Rashi does not include the word “ascend” in the heading, and uses the phrase “after the Giving of the Torah,” and not “after the Ten Commandments were given.”68

דִי צְווֵיי דִיוּקִים הַנַ״ל זַיְינֶען נָאךְ מֶער בּוֹלֵט, בְּשַׁעַת מֶען פַארְגְלַיְיכְט לְשׁוֹן רַשִׁ״י אוֹיף דֶעם פָּסוּק מִיטְן לְשׁוֹן רַשִׁ״י אוֹיפְן ווַיְיטֶערְדִיקְן פָּסוּקמז "וַיֹּאמֶר ה׳ אֶל מֹשֶׁה עֲלֵה אֵלַי הָהָרָה״ – דָארְט זָאגְט רַשִׁ״י: וַיֹּאמֶר ה׳ אֶל מֹשֶׁה – לְאַחַר מַתַּן תּוֹרָה: א) רַשִׁ״י אִיז דָארְט נִיט מַעְתִּיק "עֲלֵה", אוּן ב) זָאגְט "מַתַּן תּוֹרָה", נִיט "עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת"140!

Based on the previous explanations, it can be said that, by phrasing his commentary in this manner, Rashi indicates that this passage begins the description of the second theme of the Giving of the Torah. This concept is emphasized by the words, “This passage was related before the Ten Commandments were given.” Rashi is not merely pointing out the relevant chronology, he is also highlighting that the passage beginning, “And to Moshe, He said, ‘Ascend…,’ ” and its intent were communicated69 before the first theme of the Giving of the Torah – the revelation of G‑d’s laws, as expressed in the Ten Commandments – began.70

עַל פִּי הַנַ״ל קֶען מֶען זָאגְן: דֶערְמִיט דַיְיטֶעט אָן רַשִׁ״י אַז מִיט דֶער פַּרְשָׁה הוֹיבְּט זִיךְ אָן דֶער סִיפּוּר פוּן דֶעם צְווֵייטְן עִנְיָן אִין מַתַּן תּוֹרָה; אוּן דָאס אִיז רַשִׁ״י מַדְגִּישׁ "פַּרְשָׁה זוֹ נֶאֶמְרָה קוֹדם עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת": דֶערְמִיט מֵיינְט רַשִׁ״י צוּ זָאגְן נִיט נָאר ווֶען דָאס אִיז גֶעזָאגְט גֶעווָארְן, נָאר אוֹיךְ141 צוּ זָאגְן אַז דִי פַּרְשָׁה – "וְאֶל מֹשֶׁה אָמַר עֲלֵה" (וְתוֹכְנָהּ) אִיז גֶעזָאגְט גֶעווָארְן נָאךְ אֵיידֶער עֶס הָאט זִיךְ אָנְגֶעהוֹיבְּן דֶער עֶרְשְׁטֶער עִנְיָן הַנַ״ל אִין מַתַּן תּוֹרָה – עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת.

Rashi therefore also includes the word “ascend” in his heading because that highlights the intent of the entire passage, that Moshe ascended to G‑d. Similarly, the subsequent verses mention the theme of ascent, as the passage continues,71 “Moshe, Aharon, Nadav, Avihu, and 70 of the elders of Israel ascended and they had a vision of the G‑d of Israel.” Similarly, the following passage states, “And G‑d said to Moshe, ‘Ascend the mountain to Me…’ and Moshe ascended….”

אוּן דֶערְפַאר אִיז רַשִׁ״י אוֹיךְ מַעְתִּיק (אִין דִּיבּוּר הַמַּתְחִיל) דֶעם ווָארְט "עֲלֵה" – ווַיְיל דָאס אִיז דֶער תּוֹכֶן פוּן "פַּרְשָׁה זוֹ", ווִי מֹשֶׁה הָאט "עוֹלֶה" גֶעווֶען "אֶל ה׳",

[אוּן עַל דֶּרֶךְ זֶה אִיז אוֹיךְ דֶער ווַיְיטֶערְדִיקֶער הֶמְשֵׁךְ הַדְּבָרִים – "וַיַּעַל142 מֹשֶׁה וְאַהֲרֹן נָדָב וַאֲבִיהוּא וְשִׁבְעִים מִזִּקְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל. וַיִּרְאוּ אֵת אֱלֹקֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל גו׳", אוּן אַזוֹי אוֹיךְ דִי פַּרְשָׁה שֶׁלְּאַחֲרֶיהָ – "וַיֹּאמֶרלא ה׳ אֶל מֹשֶׁה עֲלֵה אֵלַי גו׳ וַיַּעַל מֹשֶׁה גו' "],

This is the second objective of the Giving of the Torah: that through establishing a covenant, the Jews will ascend and bond with G‑d – as indicated by the verse,72 “You shall be a treasure to Me” – connecting and elevating themselves to G‑d, thereby lifting themselves above the natural order.

ווָאס דָאס אִיז דֶער תּוֹכֶן פוּן דֶעם צְווֵייטְן עִנְיָן אִין מַתַּן תּוֹרָה, אַז דוּרְכְן כְּרִיתַת בְּרִית זַיְינֶען אִידְן "עוֹלֶה" אוּן ווֶערְן צוּגֶעבּוּנְדְן צוּם אוֹיבֶּערְשְׁטְן ("וִהְיִיתֶם לִי סְגוּלָּה גו׳"143), הִתְקַשְּׁרוּת אוּן "עֲלִיָּה" אֶל ה׳, "וְרוֹמַמְתָּנוּ".

Continuing the Sequence

6. According to the above explanations of the order of the Torah readings that describe the Giving of the Torah, it is also possible to explain the order of the subsequent Torah readings. According to Rashi’s commentary,73 G‑d’s commands to build the Sanctuary – as related in the Torah readings of Terumah, Tetzaveh, and the beginning of Ki Sissa – were communicated after the Sin of the Golden Calf, but written earlier in the Torah, following the general principle,11 “There is no sequence of earlier and later events in the Torah.” As explained above,74 there must be a reason why the Torah deviates from the proper chronological sequence. Why, then, does the Torah relate G‑d’s command to build the Sanctuary before the Sin of the Golden Calf when the actual command to do so came afterwards?

ו

לוֹיטְן בִּיאוּר הַנַ״ל אִין דֶעם סֵדֶר הַפַּרְשִׁיוֹת פוּן מַתַּן תּוֹרָה, קֶען מֶען אוֹיךְ מַסְבִּיר זַיְין דֶעם טַעַם פוּן דֶעם סֵדֶר הַפַּרְשִׁיוֹת שֶׁלְּאַחֲרֵי פַּרְשָׁתֵנוּ:

לְשִׁיטַת רַשִׁ״י בְּפֵירוּשׁוֹ עַל הַתּוֹרָה144 אִיז דֶער צִיווּי ה׳ אוֹיף מְלֶאכֶת הַמִּשְׁכָּן – דִי סִדְרוֹת פוּן תְּרוּמָה אוּן תְּצַוֶּה (אוּן הַתְחָלַת פַּרְשַׁת תִּשָּׂא) – גֶעזָאגְט גֶעווָארְן לְאַחֲרֵי מַעֲשֵׂה הָעֵגֶל, נָאר אִין תּוֹרָה אִיז עֶס כָּתוּב פְרִיעֶר, ווִי דֶער כְּלַל "אֵין מוּקְדָּם וּמְאוּחָר בַּתּוֹרָה".

– עַל פִּי הַנַ״ל (סְעִיף א) דַארְף מֶען דָאךְ הָאבְּן אַ הַסְבָּרָה: פַארְווָאס אִיז דִי תּוֹרָה מַקְדִּים שְׁרַיְיבְּן דֶעם צִיווּי אוֹיף מְלֶאכֶת הַמִּשְׁכָּן פַאר מַעֲשֵׂה הָעֵגֶל?

The question can be resolved based on the above explanations. As Rashi states at the beginning of this week’s Torah reading,the conclusion of Parshas Yisro shares a connection with the beginning of Parshas Mishpatim. Similarly, the Torah seeks to juxtapose the Torah readings communicating G‑d’s commands to build the Sanctuary with the conclusion of this Torah reading75because they both emphasize the second theme of the Giving of the Torah, as reflected in the verse, “And to Moshe, He said, ‘Ascend to G‑d...’ ” The conclusion and the consummation of this dimension of the Giving of the Torah – the covenant and the bond between the Jews and G‑d – was brought about through building76 the Sanctuary,77as reflected in the verse,78 “They shall make a Sanctuary for Me and I will dwell among them.”79

אִיז דָאס מוּבָן לוֹיטְן בִּיאוּר הַנַ״ל: דִי תּוֹרָה ווִיל מַסְמִיךְ זַיְין דִי פַּרְשִׁיוֹת פוּן צִיווּי מְלֶאכֶת הַמִּשְׁכָּן צוּם סִיּוּם פוּן אוּנְזֶער סִדְרָה145 [עַל דֶּרֶךְ ווִי רַשִׁ״י זָאגְט בִּתְחִלַּת הַסִּדְרָה, אַז סִיּוּם פַּרְשַׁת יִתְרוֹ הָאט אַ (סְמִיכוּת אוּן) קֶשֶׁר מִיט הַתְחָלַת פַּרְשַׁת מִשְׁפָּטִים], וואוּ עֶס רֶעדט זִיךְ ווֶעגְן דֶעם צְווֵייטְן עִנְיָן אִין מַתַּן תּוֹרָה – "וְאֶל מֹשֶׁה אָמַר עֲלֵה אֶל ה׳". ווַיְיל דֶער גְּמַר וּשְׁלֵימוּת פוּן דֶעם עִנְיָן אִין מַתַּן תּוֹרָה – דֶער בְּרִית וְקֶשֶׁר צְווִישְׁן אִידְן מִיטְן אוֹיבֶּערְשְׁטְן – אִיז גֶעווָארְן דוּרְךְ עֲשִׂיַּית146 הַמִּשְׁכָּן147, "וְעָשׂוּ148 לִי מִקְדָּשׁ וְשָׁכַנְתִּי בְּתוֹכָם"149.

A Spiritual Turning Point

7. To explain the inner dimension of the above concepts: The Midrash80 relates that the Giving of the Torah brought about two innovations:

a) The upper realms descended to the lower realms; “G‑d descended on Mount Sinai…,”81i.e., there was a revelation of G‑dliness from Above.

b) The lower realms ascended to the higher realms; “And to Moshe, He said, ‘Ascend to G‑d…,’ ”3 i.e., lowly beings of this material realm would begin elevating themselves to the spiritual.

ז

דֶער בִּיאוּר בְּזֶה בִּפְנִימִיּוּת הָעִנְיָנִים:

עֶס שְׁטֵייט אִין מִדְרָשׁ150, אַז בְּשַׁעַת מַתַּן תּוֹרָה הָאבְּן זִיךְ אוֹיפְגֶעטָאן צְוֵויי עִנְיָנִים: ״הָעֶלְיוֹנִים יֵרְדוּ לַתַּחְתּוֹנִים״ – "וַיֵּרֶד ה׳ עַל הַר סִינַי"151, דִי הִתְגַּלּוּת אֱלֹקוּת מִלְמַעְלָה לְמַטָּה; אוּן "הַתַּחְתּוֹנִים יַעֲלוּ לָעֶלְיוֹנִים" – "וְאֶל מֹשֶׁה אָמַר עֲלֵה אֶל ה׳", עֲלִיַּית הַתַּחְתּוֹן לְמַעְלָה.

This represents the difference between the two Torah readings describing the Giving of the Torah, Parshas Yisro and Parshas Mishpatim. Parshas Yisro primarily describes the Giving of the Torah as associated with the descent of the higher realms, “G‑d descended on Mount Sinai…,” and “G‑d spoke…,” giving the Ten Commandments.

Parshas Mishpatim, by contrast, focuses primarily on the aspects of the Giving of the Torah that relate to the Jews as they exist in the lower realms. It mentions that Moshe was commanded, “Ascend to G‑d…,”82and that the Jews made a commitment to accept the Torah, by saying,44 “We will do and we will listen,” promising “We will do” before “we will listen,”83and also building the altar, offering the sacrifices,84 and establishing of the covenant.

אוּן דָאס אִיז דֶער חִילּוּק צְווִישְׁן דִי צְווֵיי פַּרְשִׁיוֹת ווֶעגְן מַתַּן תּוֹרָה – פַּרְשַׁת יִתְרוֹ אוּן פַּרְשַׁת מִשְׁפָּטִים: אִין פַּרְשַׁת יִתְרוֹ רֶעדט זִיךְ בְּעִיקָר ווֶעגְן מַתַּן תּוֹרָה ווִי דָאס אִיז מִצַּד ״הָעֶלְיוֹנִים״ – "וַיֵּרֶד ה׳ עַל הַר סִינַי", וַיְדַבֵּר אֱלֹקִים גו׳ – עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת כו׳: בְּפַרְשָׁתֵנוּ רֶעדט זִיךְ (בְּעִיקָר) ווֶעגְן מַתַּן תּוֹרָה ווִי דָאס אִיז מִצַּד דִי ״תַּחְתּוֹנִים״ – "עֲלֵה אֶל ה׳"152: הַקְדָּמַת נַעֲשֶׂה לְנִשְׁמַע, בְּנִיַּית הַמִּזְבֵּחַ וְהַקְרָבַת קָרְבָּנוֹת153, כְּרִיתַת בְּרִית כו'.

To highlight the difference between these two dimensions of the Giving of the Torah: The awesome revelation from Above that occurred at the Giving of the Torah – that was accompanied by the descent of the Throne of Glory (G‑d’s chariot), and the Jews’ hearing the Ten Commandments from the mouth of the Almighty – was temporary. By contrast, the ascent of the lower realms (the Jewish people) achieved at the Giving of the Torah – i.e., that the Jews became servants of G‑d and were uplifted – is eternal. Since this was achieved through the actions of people on the lower realms themselves, it was eternally ingrained within the inner dimension of their being.

דֶער חִילּוּק צְווִישְׁן דִי צְווֵיי עִנְיָנִים בְּמַתַּן תּוֹרָה אִיז: דִי הִתְגַּלּוּת הָעֲצוּמָה (מִלְמַעְלָה) בְּשַׁעַת מַתַּן תּוֹרָה: יָרַד כִּסֵּא הַכָּבוֹד (מֶרְכָּבָה), שְׁמִיעָה מִפִּי הַגְּבוּרָה וכו׳ אִיז גֶעווֶען לְפִי שָׁעָה; מַה שֶׁאֵין כֵּן דִי עֲלִיַּית הַתַּחְתּוֹן (אִידְן) ווָאס הָאט זִיךְ אוֹיפְגֶעטָאן בְּשַׁעַת מַתַּן תּוֹרָה – ווָאס אִידְן זַיְינֶען גֶעווָארְן עַבְדֵי ה׳ אוּן דֶערְמִיט דֶערְהוֹיבְּן גֶעווָארְן, ״וְרוֹמַמְתָּנוּ״ – אִיז אַן עִנְיָן נִצְחִי: ווִיבַּאלְד דָאס אִיז גֶעקוּמֶען מִצַּד דִי תַּחְתּוֹנִים גּוּפָא, אִיז דָאס אִין זֵיי נִקְבָּע גֶעווָארְן אִין אַ פְּנִימִיּוּת.

The latter point also explains the connection between the passages relating the commands to build the Sanctuary and the second dimension of the Giving of the Torah, the command, “And to Moshe, He said, ‘Ascend to G‑d...” The new dimension characterizing the manifestation of the Divine presence in the Sanctuary that differed from the manifestation of the Divine presence at the Giving of the Torah has been clarified at length on a different occasion as follows:85

אוּן דָאס אִיז אוֹיךְ דֶער בִּיאוּר אִין דֶער סְמִיכַת הַפַּרְשִׁיוֹת פוּן צִיווּי מְלֶאכֶת הַמִּשְׁכָּן צוּם צְווֵייטְן עִנְיָן הַנַ״ל אִין מַתַּן תּוֹרָה, ״וְאֶל מֹשֶׁה אָמַר עֲלֵה אֶל ה׳״ – ווַיְיל דֶער אוֹיפְטוּ פוּן דֶער הַשְׁרָאַת הַשְּׁכִינָה אִין מִשְׁכָּן לְגַבֵּי הַשְׁרָאַת הַשְּׁכִינָה בְּשַׁעַת מַתַּן תּוֹרָה אִיז (ווִי גֶערֶעדט אַמָאל בַּאֲרוּכָה154):

The manifestation of the Divine presence in the Sanctuary resulted from the Jews’ efforts in response to the command, “They shall make a Sanctuary for Me….”86 As a result, the holiness was permanently vested in the very physical substance of the Sanctuary. By contrast, after the Giving of the Torah, Mount Sinai returned to its previous state; the holiness did not remain. Accordingly, G‑d said, “After the sounding of the ram’s horn” – interpreted by Rashi asthe sign of the withdrawal of the Divine presence – “they may ascend the mountain.”87

דִי הַשְׁרָאַת הַשְּׁכִינָה אִין מִשְׁכָּן אִיז גֶעקוּמֶען דוּרְךְ "וְעָשׂוּ לִי מִקְדָּשׁ"155, עַל יְדֵי עֲשִׂיַּית בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל. אוּן ווִיבַּאלְד אַז דִי הַשְׁרָאַת הַשְּׁכִינָה אִיז גֶעקוּמֶען דוּרְךְ עֲשִׂיַּית הָאָדָם, אִיז דִי קְדוּשָּׁה נִקְבָּע גֶעווָארְן אִין דֶער חֶפְצָא (גֶּשֶׁם) הַמִּשְׁכָּן [נִיט ווִי בַּיי מַתַּן תּוֹרָה ווָאס "בִּמְשׁוֹךְ הַיּוֹבֵל – סִימַן סִילּוּק שְׁכִינָה – הֵמָּה יַעֲלוּ בָהָר"156, ווַיְיל הַר סִינַי אִיז צוּרִיק גֶעווָארְן ווִי פְרִיעֶר, חוֹל].

The construction of the Sanctuary thus continues the motif of the lower realms ascending to the higher realms that began at the Giving of the Torah. The consummation of this dimension of the Giving of the Torah augments the revelation of G‑dliness from Above, enabling the manifestation of the Divine presence – achieved through the Jews’ fulfillment of the command, “They shall make a Sanctuary for Me…” – to be permanent and eternal.88

אוּן דֶער עִנְיָן (פוּן עֲשִׂיַּית הַמִּשְׁכָּן) אִיז אַ הֶמְשֵׁךְ צוּם "הַתַּחְתּוֹנִים יַעֲלוּ לָעֶלְיוֹנִים" פוּן מַתַּן תּוֹרָה, ווָאס זַיְין שְׁלֵימוּת אִיז, אַז עֶס טוּט אוֹיף אוֹיךְ אִין דֶער הִתְגַּלּ‏וּת אֱלֹקוּת מִלְמַעְלָה לְמַטָּה, אַז דֶער "וְשָׁכַנְתִּי בְּתוֹכָם" ווָאס ווֶערְט דוּרְךְ "וְעָשׂוּ לִי מִקְדָּשׁ" אִיז אִין אַן אוֹפֶן פוּן קְבִיעוּת, נִצְחִיּוּת.

LIKKUTEI SICHOS, VOLUME 26, P. 153FF. Adapted from a sichah delivered on Shabbos Parshas Mishpatim, 5743 [1983]

(משיחת ש"פ משפטים תשמ״ג)