By the Grace of G‑d

Acharon Shel Pesach, 5712

כימי צאתך מארץ מצרים אראנו נפלאות

“As in the days of your Exodus from Egypt, I will show [the people] wonders.”1

It is necessary to understand: the Future Redemption will be far loftier than the redemption from Egypt. {For this reason, Ben Zoma maintains2 that in the Era of Mashiach we will not recall the exodus from Egypt. Even according to the view of the Sages2 who state that we will recall the exodus in the Era of Mashiach, that is because the exodus possesses a [certain] advantage over the Future Redemption. Nevertheless, [as a whole,] the exodus from Egypt will be secondary to the Future Redemption.} Why then does the verse say: “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show [the people] wonders,” describing the loftiness of the Future Redemption by saying that it will be characterized by wonders similar to those of the exodus?

It is also necessary to understand [why] the verse uses the term: “I will show [the people] wonders.” This implies that the fundamental advantage of the Future Redemption is not in the very fact that there will be wonders, but in G‑d’s revelation of those wonders.

Also requiring explanation is the fact that the verb אראנו, “I will show,” uses the indefinite third person,3 while the word צאתך, “your exodus,” uses the second person. Seemingly, the verse should have read “I will show you.” The Zohar explains4 that the verse states: “I will show him,” because it refers to Moshe our teacher. Explanation is, however, required to resolve that interpretation with the simple meaning of the verse which implies that the object of “I will show” is the Jewish people.

[These questions can be resolved] on the basis [of the following] explanation: In general, there are two types of miracles:

a) miracles which transcend the natural order, like the miracles of the exodus in which water was turned to blood, and the miracle of the splitting of the Red Sea in which the sea was transformed into dry land; and

b) miracles that are enclothed in the natural order.

The latter category itself subdivides into two:

a) miracles with regard to which it is obvious that the natural order is merely a garment for the miracle that transpires. For example, the miracles of Chanukah and Purim were enclothed within the natural order, and yet their miraculous dimension was overtly revealed (to the extent that “it was seen in the farthest corners of the earth”);5 and

b) miracles in which the garments of nature conceal the miraculous dimension.6

It is well known7 that the source for the miracles that are enclothed within the natural order is higher than the source for the miracles which transcend the natural order. And the source for the miracles that are enclothed in nature to the extent that [the wondrous nature of these miracles remains concealed, and] it is not revealed that the natural order is merely a garment, comes from an even higher source.8

[To these miracles,] our Sages apply9 the verse:10 “Who alone performs great wonders,” and explain that this refers to miracles which are not recognized even by the person for whom the miracle is wrought. The source for such miracles is [a spiritual level at which G‑d is] alone [as it were].11

This is the new dimension of the Future Redemption, when “I will show [the people] wonders.” For the wonders of the Future Redemption will be drawn down from the level in which G‑d is alone, [as it were]. As our Sages commented:12 “In the past {i.e., at the time of the exodus from Egypt,} I [G‑d] and My court would proceed before you. But in the Future, I will proceed before you alone.” [Implied is that] the miracles that occurred at the time of the exodus were drawn down from G‑d through the intermediary of His court, while the miracles of the Future Redemption will come from G‑d alone {without the intermediary of His court}.13

[On this basis, we can appreciate] the uniqueness of “show[ing the people] wonders.” For the miracles which are drawn down from the level at which G‑d is alone [as it were] are {generally} expressed in a manner in which He alone is aware that a miracle occurred. [In the Era of the Redemption, by contrast,] “I will show [the people] wonders”; these miracles will be overtly revealed.

II

It is well known14 that [in the interpretation of the verse,] “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt,” emphasis is placed on the use of the plural term, “days.” For the exodus from Egypt took place in one day. {As such, [the commandment to] recall the exodus states:15 “Remember this day on which you left Egypt,” and it is written:16 “So that you will recall the day on which you left Egypt.”} Why then is the plural term, “days,” used?

[On a simple level,] it is possible to resolve the question by explaining that the “exodus from Egypt” includes the splitting of the Red Sea [which took place six days afterwards].17

{For the mitzvah of recalling the exodus each day includes the recollection of the splitting of the sea.18 Similarly, the mitzvah of relating the story of the exodus on Pesach night — of which it is said:19 “Whoever tells about it at length is worthy of being praised” — also encompasses telling of the splitting of the sea.}20

For this reason, the verse uses the plural form in the verse: “As in the days of your exodus from the land of Egypt.” {The commandment to remember the exodus, by contrast, uses the singular form, “the day,” for the fundamental aspect of the mitzvah is remembering the exodus, and the remembrance of the splitting of the sea is [secondary,] and is not of integral necessity.21}

Thus the intent of the verse, “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show [the people] wonders,” is that in the Future Redemption there will be miracles and wonders which parallel those of the exodus and the splitting of the Red Sea, as it is written:22 “And G‑d will dry up the gulf of the Egyptian Sea.... And there will be a path for the remnant of His people... as there was for Israel on the day they ascended from the land of Egypt.”

Thus it is necessary to understand the connection between the two concepts explained with regard to the verse: “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show [the people] wonders”:

a) that even those wonders which are drawn down from the level at which G‑d is alone [as it were] will be revealed, (i.e., their miraculous dimension will be evident), and

b) that among the wonders of the Future Redemption will also be a parallel to the splitting of the Red Sea.

III

The above concepts can be explained by prefacing [the principle mentioned above,] that the source of the miracles enclothed within the natural order is higher than the source for the miracles which transcend the natural order. [The rationale for this principle is that] with regard to the miracles which transcend the natural order, the Or Ein Sof, G‑d’s Infinite Light, which transcends the worlds (the source for miracles) is revealed in a manner which nullifies the natural order, upsetting the pattern of nature. As such, these revelations are not drawn down within the world.

With regard to the miracles which are enclothed in nature, by contrast, the revelation of the Or Ein Sof which transcends the worlds permeates the worlds themselves.23

Now limitation and infinity are two opposites. Thus, for the revelation of Or Ein Sof, G‑d’s Infinite Light, to permeate the world itself, it is necessary that the infinite [revelation] be drawn down from G‑d’s essence which is present everywhere, even within the limitations (and the natural order) of [our material] world.

There is a second explanation with regard to the advantage of the miracles which are enclothed in the natural order over the miracles which transcend the natural order. The purpose of miracles is to reveal how G‑d dominates and controls nature.24 This purpose is more thoroughly revealed through the miracles which are enclothed within the natural order. The miracles which transcend the natural order reveal His sovereignty by showing that He has the potential to nullify and upset the rules of nature. The miracles which are enclothed within the natural order, by contrast, demonstrate that the Or Ein Sof dominates and controls nature itself.25 Nature itself acts according to His will.26

IV

With regard to the difference between the two explanations [given above], the advantage of the miracles which are enclothed within nature can be understood by the preface of [an explanation of] a passage from the text, the Akeidah.27[That text] states that it is possible to recognize the greatness of the Creator, [not only through miracles, but] also through the natural order.

Not only does contemplation of the course of the activity of the universe (e.g., the movement of the celestial bodies) bring one to an awareness that “there is a Master to this structure,”28 but [even more impressive is that] the activity of the natural order is constant, without change, as it is written:29 “[...Day and night] will not cease.” Although almost 6000 years have passed since creation, the activity of the natural order continues without ebb. {Moreover, throughout this entire time, even the energy [maintaining] the created beings has not ebbed. For the existence of each one of the heavenly hosts and each species of the earthly hosts have remained constant; they are as powerful as the day on which they were created.30}

[Awareness of these truths] endows us with knowledge of the greatness of the Creator, that His power (from which His influence is drawn down into the world) is truly infinite.

The life-energy of every particular created being is limited. For the nature of every created being is dependent on the Divine life-energy enclothed within them. Since we see that the nature of every created being is defined according to the life-energy it [is granted, we can assume that this life-energy itself is defined and limited].31 This, however, refers to the nature [of the specific created beings]. The [activity of the] natural order [as a whole] and the fact that it continues without change or weakness [is, by contrast, an obvious expression] of [G‑d’s] infinite power that is not enclothed within the world.

Nevertheless, to appreciate the greatness of G‑d [by observing] the natural order requires meditation. When, by contrast, one sees a miracle, a deviation from the natural order, one perceives immediately (without the need for meditation) the expression of [G‑d’s] infinity which is not limited to the framework of the world.

There is another advantage to miracles over nature: (Even after meditation, [there is a drawback to the appreciation of G‑dliness that stems from the natural order]). The infinite power which is revealed through the constancy of the natural order is enclothed within the limitations of nature; [it is an awareness that] nature (i.e., limitation) persists without end or change. Through miracles, by contrast, the revelation of the infinity of the Or Ein Sof which transcends [all possibility of] being enclothed in limitation becomes manifest.

In this regard, nevertheless, there is an advantage to the revelation of [G‑d’s] infinite power through the constancy of the natural order over the revelation through miracles. For the revelation of G‑d’s infinity through miracles disrupts the natural order and thus does not relate to the world [within its own context]. The constancy of the natural order, by contrast, reveals how even the (limited) life-energy of the world is connected with the infinity of Or Ein Sof.

The above can be explained based on the statements in the series of maamarim [entitled Yom Tov Shel Rosh HaShanah,] 5666.32 There it is stated that the constancy of the natural order (— [which is an expression of G‑d’s infinity] although as explained above, the natural [order itself] comes from the Divine life-energy invested in the created beings, and this life-energy is limited in nature —) comes about because the source for the life-energy enclothed in the created beings is (not from the keilim, but rather) from the light of the kav, whose source is the Or Ein Sof that existed before the tzimtzum.

As explained in several sources,33 the source for the keilim is the tzimtzum itself, while the source of the kav is the Or Ein Sof that existed before the tzimtzum (but it is, nevertheless, drawn down [intoexistence] via the tzimtzum, [and thus affected by the tzimtzum]. As the Eitz Chayim states:34 After the tzimtzum, He drew down from the Or Ein Sof one straight line from its sphere.35 As is well known,36 the kav broke through the darkness of the tzimtzum, and any breakthrough stems from the power of gevurah, might.37 For the source for the kav is the attribute of tiferes38which is hidden, i.e., a level that transcends the light which shines (in revelation) before the tzimtzum.

On this basis, we can explain the advantage of the revelation of the power of the Ein Sof through the constancy of the natural order over the revelation of the Ein Sof through miracles. For the light that exists before the tzimtzum is also limited in that it is infinite; it is impossible for it to be revealed within the limited context of the worlds.39 Therefore the light which is sovev [kol almin] {which is a revelation of the light which exists before the tzimtzum}40 which is the source for miracles, is revealed through a disruption of the natural order, negating the nature (limitations) of the world.

The light of the kav, by contrast, because its source is the attribute of tiferes which is hidden, includes and combines the two opposites of infinity and limitation. Accordingly, the revelation of infinity which the light of the kav brings about, ([the fact that the natural order continues] endlessly) is also expressed within limitation (nature).

V

In the previous section, it was explained that the constancy of the natural order is also an expression of the infinity of Or Ein Sof which transcends the world, and the advantage of miracles is that through them is revealed the infinite dimensions of Or Ein Sof which transcend the possibility of being enclothed within the world.

On this basis, it is possible to say that the two types of miracles mentioned previously, the miracles which transcend nature and the miracles which are enclothed in nature, reflect two expressions of the revelation of infinite dimensions of Or Ein Sof which transcend the possibility of being enclothed within the world.

According to this explanation, the statement in sec. III — that the advantage of the miracles enclothed in the natural order is that the revelation of the Or Ein Sof is enclothed within the natural order — highlights the concept that these miracles also involve the advantage of relating to the natural order. The context of miracles [involves] (the revelation of the infinite dimensions of Or Ein Sof which transcend [the possibility of] being enclothed [within the natural order].) Within this context, the advantage of the miracles enclothed in the natural order is that they serve as a medium to reveal that the infinite dimensions of Or Ein Sof (which transcend [all] possibility of being enclothed within nature), control and dominate nature. [Moreover, this is brought about, not by breaking nature, but by] causing nature itself to reflect His will (the second explanation given in sec. III).

Similar concepts also apply with regard to the miracles which transcend nature. The advantage of these miracles is [twofold]: a) that they are overtly revealed; b) there is (one dimension) in which the concept that the infinite dimensions of Or Ein Sof control and dominate nature is revealed more powerfully.

With regard to the miracles that are enclothed within nature, the natural order retains its power. The dominion of Or Ein Sof over nature is (only) that nature [is compelled] to do His will. With regard to the miracles that transcend nature, by contrast, the natural order becomes nullified entirely and the dominion over nature is complete, effecting the very essence of its existence.

It is possible to explain that the difference between these two types of miracles [is dependent on the difference] in their source. The source for the miracles that are enclothed in the natural order is the revelation of the infinite dimensions of Or Ein Sof as it allows for the existence of limitation. Therefore the revelation of this light allows for the existence of nature (i.e., limitation), except that [it dictates that] this limited framework will reflect the will of the infinite dimensions of Or Ein Sof.

The miracles which transcend nature, by contrast, have their source in the infinite dimensions of Or Ein Sof, which transcend limitation entirely. Therefore, in the face of the revelation of this light, nature is utterly nullified. {To cite a parallel, in other sources41 it is explained that will and intellect serve as an analogy for the light of sovev [kol almin] (the source for miracles) and memale [kol almin] (the source for nature).} The dimension of the will which is drawn down to the level of intellect and which affects it, creating a rationale for the will, is only the external dimension of the will. The essence of the will is not drawn down into intellect. It is said: “There is no reason for will.”

There is, nevertheless, an advantage to the miracles which are enclothed in nature: for these miracles reveal the dominion which Or Ein Sof has over (the manner) of nature itself. It is possible to say that the difference between these two types of miracles parallels the difference between the bittul of the sublime unity and the bittul produced by kabbalas ol.

The fact that nature becomes utterly nullified in the face of the revelation of the infinite dimensions of Or Ein Sof (i.e., the miracles which transcend the natural order) resembles the complete and total bittul of the sublime unity which results from the contemplation that “everything is of utterly no importance before Him.”42

And the fact that the natural order can continue to follow its pattern and yet its pattern will [be altered] — that instead of following its [ordinary] rules and tendencies, it will conform to His will (i.e., the miracles which are enclothed in nature) — relates to the bittul of kabbalas ol. [For a servant who has kabbalas ol]retains his individual identity — indeed, “a servant desires to be unrestrained”43 — and, nevertheless, in practice, his conduct does not reflect his own will, but that of his master.

VI

It is well known44 that the advantage of the bittul of the sublime unity is that it is all encompassing. (No dimension of one’s being remains that is not nullified. With regard to the bittul produced by kabbalas ol, by contrast, the bittul affects only the person’s conduct. [His sense of personal identity remains intact.])

[There is, however, an advantage to] the bittul of kabbalas ol, that advantage being the quality of the bittul. The person truly goes beyond himself, expressing self-nullification which is not at all related to his personal identity.

[To explain:] Since the bittul of the sublime unity is contingent on a person’s recognition and appreciation that “everything is of utterly no importance before Him,” the person’s self-nullification depends on his selfhood (his understanding) and does not represent true bittul. The bittul of kabbalas ol, by contrast, involves the acceptance of G‑d’s commandments even when they run contrary to one’s own will, like a servant who is compelled to carry out the will of his master. Since this type of bittul does not leave room for his own selfhood, it is true bittul.

It is possible to say that similar concepts apply with regard to the miracles which are enclothed in nature. The nullification of the natural order to Or Ein Sof with regard to these miracles affects only the course of the natural order, and not its essence. Nevertheless, the ordinary tendency of nature does not allow for the course of nature to lead to a miracle. The deviation from the natural order (i.e., the miracle), comes about because Or Ein Sof rules over nature and controls it as it sees fit. Thus the nullification of the natural order reflected by these miracles is thoroughly genuine.

VII

Based on the above, we can appreciate the uniqueness of the prophecy “I will show you miracles,” which will be fulfilled in the Era of the Redemption. At that time, even the miracles which are enclothed in the natural order will be revealed, (i.e., [mankind] will be able to perceive these miracles).

[This will, moreover, represent a higher level] within the miracles themselves. The fact that, at present, the natural order conceals the miracles is because the natural order (even when a miracle is enclothed within it) represents the very opposite of the miraculous. For, as explained in sec. V, a miracle represents a deviation from the natural order, a change from its ordinary functioning. Therefore [in the present era, the uniqueness of] the miracles which transcend the natural order is more apparent.

In the Era of the Redemption, however, the miracles which are enclothed within the natural order will (also) be revealed, as it is said, “I will show you wonders,” (i.e., the miracles which are enclothed within nature will also become apparent). [The reason for this difference is that] in the Era of the Redemption, the natural order will be elevated, and it will also be a suitable medium for the revelation of the infinite dimensions of Or Ein Sof which will be enclothed within it. Therefore, the miracles which are enclothed in nature will also be overtly revealed.

Thus the new dimension implied by the prophecy “I will show you wonders,” that the wonders will be perceived, will be reflected in the wonders themselves. At present, the miracles enclothed in nature are such that even after the revelation of the infinite dimensions of the Or Ein Sof through the miracle, the existence of the natural order remains [unaffected]. And its thrust is directly opposite to the revelation of infinite light (except that the revelation of infinite light controls it and compels its course to follow the dictates of G‑d’s will).

In the Era of the Redemption, by contrast, the miracles that are enclothed within the natural order will possess both advantages:

a) the revelation of Or Ein Sof will be expressed within the natural order; and

b) there will be no entity whose existence runs contrary to the revelation of [G‑d’s] infinity, for even nature will be a medium [for the expression of] the infinite dimensions of Or Ein Sof.

VIII

A connection can be made between the above concepts and the well-known principle45 that in the Future Era, the soul will derive its nurture from the body. In the present era, the body derives its nurture from the soul, but in the Future Era, [the pattern will be reversed, and] the soul will derive its nurture from the body. In that era as well, the body will remain a material entity. Nevertheless, it will derive its nurture from G‑dliness and it will not require material food and drink. Indeed, the body will be on a higher [spiritual plane] than the soul.

To explain: The bittul of the body to G‑d arouses a higher spiritual level than the bittul of the soul.46 Since the soul is a spiritual entity, its bittul to G‑d is an expression of its identity. When [by contrast, a person] through his Divine service brings about the bittul of the body, a material entity, this bittul is not an expression of the body’s identity, but rather comes about because of G‑dliness.

At present, however, the bittul of the soul is complete and all encompassing (bittul bimetzius), while the bittul ofthe body is not [sufficient to] erase its self-consciousness (bittul hayesh).47 In the Future Era, the bittul of the body will possess both these qualities: Its bittul will come as a result of G‑dliness, and it will encompass every dimension of its existence. Therefore, in that Future Era, the soul will derive its nurture from the body.

IX

It can be explained that the above concept depends on the principle that the revelations of the Era of the Redemption are dependent on our deeds and Divine service in the era of exile.48 For it is the Divine service in the era of exile that brings about the true expression of bittul.

In the era of the Beis [HaMikdash], the Jews were able to conceptually appreciate G‑dliness. Moreover, during the pilgrimage festivals, when they came [to the Beis HaMikdash], they would actually see G‑dliness.49 [Accordingly, G‑dliness] was an element of their personal identities. In the era of exile, and particularly, in ikvesa diMeshicha, [there is no direct appreciation of G‑dliness]. Instead, our Divine service is based on kabbalas ol. The bittul of kabbalas ol is not an expression of a person’s identity, but rather stems from G‑d.50

This concept reflects the explanations found in the maamarim of the previous Rebbeim51 on the verse:52 “And the man Moshe was more humble than any man on the face of the earth.” Moshe’s humility, [these maamarim state, stemmed from his contemplation of the Divine service of the Jews in the time of exile, and] particularly in the generation of ikvesa diMeshicha when the veiling and concealment [of G‑dliness] is great. Nevertheless, when [Moshe saw that] the people of that age will stand with powerful and firm resolution and study the Torah and observe mitzvos with true self-sacrifice, Moshe was overwhelmed entirely.53

Moshe’s level of bittul reflected that of the sublime unity, as reflected in the phrase,54 ואנחנו מה. The Divine service of the generation of ikvesa diMeshicha reflects the bittul of kabbalas ol and mesirus nefesh. And the bittul of the sublime unity was totally overwhelmed by the bittul of kabbalas ol and mesirus nefesh.

This is why the revelations of the Era of the Redemption are dependent on our Divine service in the era of exile. For the fundamental dimension of the revelations of the Era of the Redemption is that the uniqueness of the expression of [G‑d’s] infinite light within the context of nature and a physical body will be revealed at that time. [Mankind will appreciate that] their bittul is not merely an expression of their personal existence, but rather stems from G‑dliness. And the revelation of this truth comes about because of the bittul of kabbalas ol and mesirus nefesh in the era of exile.

X

During the exodus from Egypt, the miracles transcended the natural order. It is only in the Era of the Redemption that [we will merit] “I will show you wonders,” {that the miracles will be enclothed in nature and yet their wondrous qualities will be revealed}. Nevertheless, as is well known,55 the exodus from Egypt opened the way for all future redemptions, including the Ultimate Redemption. Thus it is possible to say that the concept of “I will show you wonders” was also manifest during the exodus from Egypt, except it was manifest in a hidden manner, and in the Future Redemption, this dimension will be revealed.

This is the intent of the verse, “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show [the people] wonders,” and the comparison of the wonders of the Future Redemption with those of the exodus, although the wonders of the Future Redemption will be performed by G‑d Himself, (without [the intervention of] His court, unlike those of the exodus),56 for the exodus from Egypt opened the path for the Future Redemption, and it contained — in a hidden manner — the wonders of the Future Redemption as well.

The verse speaks of “the days of your exodus from Egypt,” using the plural form, including also the miracle of the splitting of the Red Sea which took place on the seventh day of the exodus (as explained above in sec. 2). This emphasizes that the splitting of the Red Sea also opened the path for — and in a hidden way includes — the splitting of the sea in the Era of the Redemption (as it is written:57 “And G‑d will dry up the gulf of the Egyptian Sea....”) and also the splitting of the [Euphrates River which will take place in] the Era of the Redemption (as it is written:58 “And He shall raise His hand over the river... and split it into seven streams”).

The splitting of the river represents a higher level than the splitting of the sea. For the splitting of the sea represents the connection [of the world] of Atzilus to [the worlds of] Beriah, Yetzirah, and Asiyah. The splitting of the river, by contrast, represents the connection of the worlds (Atzilus, Beriah, Yetzirah, and Asiyah) to the infinite dimensions of Or Ein Sof which transcend Atzilus.59Nevertheless, the splitting of the sea at the time of the exodus contained the potential for both the splitting of the sea and the splitting of the river in the Era of the Redemption.

It is possible to connect both of the dimensions explained above with regard to the verse “I will show you wonders”: that (as intimated by the phrase “as in the days”) the wonders that will take place in the Future Redemption will include both the splitting of the sea and the splitting of the river and that the miracles which are enclothed in nature will be overtly revealed. For the fact that in the Era of the Redemption, nature will not conceal the miracles which are enclothed within it will come as a result of the connection between the infinite dimensions of Or Ein Sof and the limits of the nature of our world. This connection is represented by the splitting of the sea and the splitting of the river.

The verse tells us that the wonders that will be revealed in the Era of the Redemption (and the two factors mentioned above) are “as in the days of your exodus from Egypt,” [i.e., they have parallels in that redemption,] and that redemption opened the path for them.

XI

It is possible to [amplify the above concepts by explaining the continuation of the verse:]14 “And He shall raise His hand over the river...” “And He shall lead [them] through [wearing] shoes.” [A shoe can serve as an analogy.]60 In a material sense, a shoe is made from a coarse hide [that has been made suitable for use. How is] the coarse hide made suitable to serve as a shoe (a garment for the foot of a human being)? [First,] the hide must be softened. As the hide exists in its natural state (before it is softened), it is firm and cannot be manipulated. Only when it is softened can it be manipulated and formed into a shoe.

Similarly, in a spiritual sense, “And He shall lead [them] through [wearing] shoes” means that we will tread over the nature of our bodies and our animal souls and, in so doing, soften their hardness, preventing them from being “firm like a cedar,” but rather “flexible like a reed.”61

For this reason, the Hebrew word for Divine service, avodah(עבודה) relates to the term “ibud oros(עיבוד עורות), “tanning hides,”62 for the fundamental aspect of avodah is that a person fight against his natural tendencies, as explained in Tanya,63 with regard to the definition of “a servant of G‑d” (עובד א-להים).

Through such efforts, refinement is brought about (not only within a person’s individual nature), but in the nature of the world at large. This is also implied by the name עובד א-להים, for א-להים (G‑d’s name, E-lohim) is numerically equivalent to the word הטבע meaning “nature.”64 Being a servant of G‑d (עובד א-להים) involves working over and correcting [in both a personal and all-encompassing sense] nature which stems from the name E-lohim.65

This is the intent of the verse “And He shall raise His hand over the river... and He shall lead [them] through [wearing] shoes” — that in the Era of the Redemption, there will be a fusion of the world’s nature with the infinite dimensions of Or Ein Sof that transcend the worlds. The preparation for this will be the splitting of the river which, in turn, will be brought about through Divine service with kabbalas ol, pushing oneself against one’s nature.

XII

Based on the above, we can understand the statement of the Zohar66 that the use of the indefinite third person in the phrase “I will show wonders” refers to Moshe. For the Redemption and the exodus from Egypt was led by Moshe. And based on the above explanation that the exodus from Egypt also opened the way for the Future Redemption, it follows that it was Moshe who opened up the way for the wonders that will take place in the Future Redemption. For Moshe himself, however, [these wonders] were hidden.

This is the intent of the verse “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show wonders,” that in the Era of the Redemption, the wonders for which [Moshe] opened the way through the exodus will be revealed for him.

It is also possible to say that the fact that the use of the indefinite third person in the phrase “I will show wonders” refers to Moshe serves as instruction for every member of the Jewish people. For to be worthy to see the wonders of the Era of the Redemption, [every Jew must] reveal the spark of Moshe contained within his [soul].67

[The above statement presents somewhat of a conceptual difficulty.] For the bittul of Moshe reflects the bittul of the sublime unity that results from [the awareness of] the revealed dimensions [of G‑dliness], while “I will show you wonders” comes about through the bittul of kabbalas ol (as explained above, sec. 9). Nevertheless, [although the fundamental cause is the bittul of kabbalas ol,] in order that [the wonders] be revealed (“I will show you”), it is necessary that there also be [a contributing influence of] the bittul that results from [the awareness of] the revealed dimensions [of G‑dliness,] {i.e., through meditation that “everything is of utterly no importance before Him,”68 and the like}.

Through [this Divine service, we will merit] “I will show wonders,” the wonders of the Era of the Redemption will be overtly revealed with the coming of Mashiach. May this take place in the immediate future.