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Coaching Tips for Parents, Educators, and Mentors

Finding the Kernel of Good
Ask yourself: How are you viewing the person you will mentor?
A Mental Workout
How much effort does it take to coach someone?
I Believe in You
You have just the solution. You know the formula—the exact steps she could take to overcome her difficulties and reach her goal. Resist the temptation to offer it. As a mentor, your role isn’t to swoop in and save your mentee, but to guide her to take responsibility for herself.
Check Your Blindspot
We all have one, if not more. We love ourselves too much to see ourselves accurately.
Experiencing the Ultimate Satisfaction
While struggle isn’t easy, overcoming it brings the deepest satisfaction possible.
Equipped to Overcome
Which “spiritual strengths” do you or your mentee possess? How can they be utilized to combat a negative trait?
Deliberate Delivery: Yelling and Shaming Never Work
It takes effort to operate in a preemptive manner, rather than an instinctive one.
Flipping the Coin
As a coach, it is your job to help identify a coachee’s weakness and explore how to flip the coin, utilizing the strength of their personality and shedding their weakness.
The Impact of Circumstance
Does our environment, something so external, influence us?
Are Your Habits Your Best Friend or Worst Enemy?
There’s a little autocrat in my head literally dictating to me what my next step should be. The autocrat’s name is Habit, and it could be my best friend or my worst enemy.
Could the Exodus Story Be the Best Coaching Model?
Right now, chances are you are struggling with something; we all have our pain points. When you plug your current struggle into a framework, you have a path and a way forward.
First Things First: How Not to Tackle Change
If you try to put a stop to too much, there will be an overwhelming amount of inner resistance.
Because You Can Only Change Yourself
Why? Why are they crying about each other’s tragedy, rather than their own?
Sometimes, words of reproach are necessary. But when they are offered against a backdrop of love—with firm trust between the student and teacher, child and parent—then the child can hear and internalize and grow from what his mentor is saying.
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