Do you know that type of person, the one who doesn’t fit in anywhere? That’s me. That is the way I always was, that’s the way I am, and that is the way I will most likely always be. I just don’t fit in, anywhere.

There are times when I am sitting in the park, and all the mothers are dressed in chic black skirts and elegant black sweaters, and I silently sit alone with a plain green sweater and simple brown skirt. And there are times, in a different park, when all the mothers are dressed in flowing flower skirts and funky sweaters, and I silently sit alone with a plain green sweater and simple brown skirt. I sit alone and I watch my children. I sit alone, in silence, and I feel alone. I think to myself, “Wow, I really don’t fit it in.”

I just don’t fit in, anywhere.

The ironic thing about my not fitting in is that I have an eclectic group of friends from all over the world who, even though they do fit in somewhere, also find themselves not really fitting in, in one way or another. I have hippie friends and yuppie friends. I have friends who are ten years younger than me, and friends who are forty years older. I have friends who are vegans, and friends who eat meat and potatoes (the potato being the only vegetable that they will eat). And you know what, I love them all, and I know that they love me.

My husband is the same way, and we found each other, and thank G‑d we have each other. So I ask you, why at times I have friends who are ten years younger than me, and friends who are forty years older.does the loneliness overcome me? And what do I do when it does? I take out my book of Psalms and I begin to read the words of King David: “I am always with You; You grasped my right hand. In Your counsel may You guide me, and afterwards You will take my soul unto You. Whom else do I have in Heaven? And when I am with You I do not desire anything on earth . . . ,” or I open my mouth and in a soft whisper I pour my heart out to G‑d.

An incredible thing happened when G‑d gave us the Ten Commandments. The entire nation of Israel—men, women, children—everyone was there, waiting, eager, excited to receive the Torah. Can you imagine the scene? Can you picture the noise and commotion—the babies crying, children whining, women chattering and men talking? And what happened next? There was silence! Not a word was spoken, not a cry was heard.

The sages tell us that not a bird chirped, nor did a cow moo. Even the angels were silent. Silence. Every Jew stood at Mount Sinai, they stood united as one nation, and yet each one stood alone in silence to hear the words, “I am the L‑rd your G‑d. The One who took you from the land of Egypt, from the house of slavery.”

The great sage Rabbi Yochanan explained that the voice split into seven voices, so that that each one could hear it according to his or her capacity. Moses heard it according to his level, the men according to theirs, the women according to theirs, and adolescents according to their capacity. The children heard it according to their level, and the elders according to theirs. And these seven voices were further divided into seventy languages, so that the seventy nations of the world could hear and understand these ten phrases/commandments, which begin with “I am the L‑rd your G‑d.”

On the holiday of Shavuot there is a custom to read the entire book of Psalms, which was compiled by King David. Before he was anointed as king, David was a shepherd who played the harp and herded his father’s sheep. David didn’t fit in amongst his six handsome and David didn’t fit in amongst his six handsome and intelligent brothers.intelligent brothers. Really, he didn’t fit in anywhere, and felt most comfortable alone with his harp and his sheep. He would meditate, learn Torah, and pour his heart out to G‑d in song. This sensitive soul, who didn’t seem to fit in anywhere, was the one who G‑d chose as His anointed king. The one who stood alone, and yet who knew that he was never alone because he knew that he could turn to G‑d in every moment and in every situation, was the one selected to lead the nation of Israel.

How powerful that King David died on the day when G‑d gave us the Torah and told us in a voice that related to everyone that He is our G‑d, that no matter where we are, no matter what we are doing or who we are with, “I am the L‑rd your G‑d.” You are with Me, and therefore you are never alone.