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Slavery

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Abraham In Parshat Mishpatim we witness one of the great stylistic features of the Torah, its transition from narrative to law. Until now the book of Exodus has been primarily narrative: the story of the enslavement of the Israelites and their journey to ...
If you strike your slave's eye or tooth, the Torah decrees, the slave goes free. What relavence does this law have in a society that has abandoned the practice of slavery?
For an informed reading of Jeremiah 34:8–22, 33:25–26
The first mitzvah in the portion of Mishpatim is that of freeing slaves.
G-d wants us to be free to serve Him, and not to any other entity
If G‑d does not want slavery, if He regards it as an affront to the human condition, why did He not abolish it immediately? Why did He allow it to continue, albeit in a restricted and regulated way?
Of all the laws in the Parshah—and there are many—why begin with the “regressive” topic of slavery?
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