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Cities of Refuge (Arei Miklat)

Knowledge Base » Torah, The » Halacha (Torah law) » Halachic Concepts & Issues » Cities of Refuge (Arei Miklat)
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Cities of Refuge (Arei Miklat): In biblical times, six cities in the Land of Israel were designated as "cities of refuge." A person who accidentally killed someone found safe haven there from avenging relatives.
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Learn about the ancient cities in Israel where killers and priests rubbed shoulders
The cities of refuge were only for those who killed accidentally, not knowing the consequences of their actions.
Isn't encouragement of vengeance precisely what the City of Refuge system does? Doesn't the American system do a better job of dealing with such a sad episode, discouraging vigilante justice?
A Taste of Text—Massei
The six constants that apply to every Jew, at all times and in all circumstances, are readily accessible to one who seeks refuge from his failings.
He was standing at the entrance of the strip mall, his front and back covered by identical, cumbersome cardboard signs. He was still there a few hours later when I returned from the synagogue . . .
Therapists are nice (and expensive) and there are times when they are needed. But there are the times when all we need is someone who knows us, who cares for us, a wise person with a little life experience...
A Torah Perspective
Under America’s criminal justice system, we have incarcerated more than two million of our fellow citizens in federal, state and county facilities. In contrast, the concept of prison does not appear anywhere in Judaism...
Whenever they arrest a murderer or deviant, you can be sure that a fleet of trained mouthpieces will portray the perpetrator as a victim of a miserable childhood or genetic predisposition to violence. Is there truth to these assertions?
Now this is very strange. Here is a man who, though not a murderer, is not entirely innocent of having caused the loss of a person's life. Opposite him stands the High Priest of Israel, noble, aristocratic and, arguably, the holiest Jew alive. Do we reall...
“The court is obligated to straighten the roads to the cities of refuge, to repair them and broaden them . . . ‘Refuge, Refuge’ was written at all crossroads, so that the murderers should recognize the way and turn there . . .”
I had been a seeker for many years by the time I knocked on the door of Lubavitch House...
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