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Bikurim (first fruits)

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Bikurim (first fruits): the first fruits which the Jews would bring to the Temple in Jerusalem
Even important personages, such as the king of Israel, placed baskets on their shoulders and proceeded until the Temple Courtyard.
This week's parsha, Ki Tavo, begins with the mitzvah of bikkurim, bringing your first fruits to G‑d. The first fruits were brought to the Temple, received by the Kohen and placed next to the altar. When giving it to the Kohen, every person bringing first ...
Couldn’t G‑d have given the poor farmer who traveled all the way to Jerusalem a simpler way of saying “thank you”?
The "personal" mitzvah of Bikkurim teaches that even as we explore our individual path towards G‑d, our personal journey and destiny is deeply intertwined with, and part of the process and progress of our nation.
The sages of the Talmud disagree on the point in Jewish history at which time the obligation to bring bikkurim (“first fruits”) came into effect. The Rebbe sees their debate as a lesson on the nature, uses and hindrances of knowledge and consciousness.
We all have the same problem. It just shows itself in different forms. On the one hand we want freedom: healthy, pure, wholesome joys, the just rewards and fruits of our efforts. On the other hand, this quest is beset by problems, which we can group under...
The first approach reflects the depth of one’s faith, but is likely to be a very abstract and amorphous response. The second, steeped in intellect, may lack the spontaneity and power of the first, but truly penetrates the entire personality of the individ...
Without collective achievement, we cannot achieve individual fulfillment.
One of the prison guards told the Rebbe that when he beats a prisoner, he drinks his tea without its usual dose of sugar. Just watching the torture sweetened his tea... With a Jew, it's the other way around: knowing that a fellow's needs are unsatisfied s...
For the common folk, this mitzvah was so precious. It represented the thrill of “I get to bring a gift to G‑d!”
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