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Matzah

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Matzah: unleavened bread eaten on Passover
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I've always thought it was because the dough did not have enough time to rise, but now I've been told there are other reasons.
The history of crunchy matzah
I’ve heard people say that matzah used to be soft. Is this true? And if it is, can I use pita for my matzah?
While this matzah can be made out of flour from any of the five grains (wheat, barley, spelt, rye and oats), the famed codifier of Jewish law, Rabbi Moshe Isserlis, writes that the custom is to specifically use wheat flour for the matzah...
I often see egg matzah for sale, and have been wondering whether we can serve it at the Seder instead of regular matzah. I have always found it so much tastier . . .
Question: Passover is over, and I have tons of leftover matzah. What should I do with it? Am I still allowed to eat it? Answer: The first thing to take into consideration is that you should make sure to save some for Pesach Sheni (the "Second Passover") w...
So, they happened to eat matzah because they were in a rush. So what? I thought that Passover is about freedom, not food!
All About Matzo Ball Soup and Kneidelach
Served in chicken soup, matzo balls are dumplings made of matzo meal (ground matzo), egg, oil, water and flavoring
Whether or not such wheat will ever be developed, your question is a fascinating one!
The short and simple answer is that another name for matzah is lechem oni—“poor man's bread” or “bread of poverty.”
The paragraph in the Haggadah which immediately follows the Four Questions contains the response to the four questions. A modicum of thought suffices to uncover the answers inherent in its words: We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt, and the L-rd, our G‑d, ...
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