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Concepts in Chassidic Philosophy

Knowledge Base » Torah, The » Kabbalah & Chassidism; Mysticism » Chassidism » Concepts in Chassidic Philosophy
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What is tzimtzum like?
I long struggled with the kabbalistic map of the cosmos, convinced that these mysteries could be grasped in a more relevant way. A single class on tzimtzum opened up an entire world of insight and discovery.
A chassidic meditation on the ambiguity of Achashveirosh in the Megillah and of G-d in the world
Part 1: Kingship and Theology in the Purim Story Of all the major characters of the Purim story, the megillah, the most ambiguous is King Achashveirosh. On the one hand, he is the only character who features throughout the story. Everything revolves aroun...
The real deal on Chabad’s apocalyptic calculations, and why Jews have always predicted elusive ends.
To live messianically is not to abandon the present moment, but to live the present moment so completely that it transcends its own limitations.
Secret Steps to Jewish Happiness
A sequential approach to self improvement from the author's perspective and topics important to personal growth in the modern age.
13 thoughts to meditate upon
13 thoughts to meditate upon
Everything is forever running and returning
We intuitively think of matter as something very static, just sitting there. It’s strange to think of matter as a tune being played by a string. What if our entire reality is just that?
We already know from our sages that the purpose behind creation of this world is G‑d's desire to dwell in the lowest realms. But what did they mean by lowest?
The concept of dirah b'tachtonim ("a dwelling in the physical world") addresses the most basic questions of existence: What is our world? What is matter and physicality? What is holiness? What does G-d want of us? Why are we here?
I was at a chassidic gathering where the Chabad rabbi was discussing overcoming adversity. He used the Yiddish saying of the fourth Chabad rebbe, the Rebbe Maharash: "l’chatchila ariber." What exactly does that mean?
Somehow, the very earth we touch must become acutely aware of its absolute nothingness while remaining a complete something. And you and I are given the responsibility to accomplish that.
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