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Jonathan Sacks

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Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks is an international religious leader, philosopher, and respected moral voice. The author of over 30 books, Rabbi Sacks has received multiple awards in recognition of his work including the 2016 Templeton Prize. He is the recipient of 18 honorary doctorates, was knighted by Her Majesty The Queen in 2005 and made a Life Peer, taking his seat in the House of Lords in October 2009. He served as the Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth from 1991 to 2013. To read more writings and teachings by Lord Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, please visit www.rabbisacks.org.
There are, it is sometimes said, no controlled experiments in history. Every society, every age, and every set of circumstances is unique. If so, there is no science of history. There are no universal rules to guide the destiny of nations. Yet this is not...
There is something unique about the way Parshat Emor speaks about Shabbat. It calls it a mo’ed and a mikra kodesh when, in the conventional sense of these words, it is neither. Mo’ed means an appointed time with a fixed date on the calendar. Mikra kodesh ...
Something fundamental happens at the beginning of this parsha and the story is one of the greatest, if rarely acknowledged, contributions of Judaism to the world.
The power of ritual is that it does not speak in abstractions – reason versus emotion, instinctual deferral rather than gratification
All it takes for evil to flourish is for good people to do nothing.
The common factor was generosity. Jews may not always make the right choices in what they give to, but they give.
It is a moment of the very highest drama. The Israelites, a mere forty days after the greatest revelation in history, have made an idol: a Golden Calf. G‑d threatens to destroy them.
For once Moses, the hero, the leader, the liberator, the lawgiver, is off-stage.
It is hard to understand the depth of the crisis into which the destruction of the First Temple plunged the Jewish people.
The Torah asks, why should you not hate the stranger? Because you once stood where he stands now. You know the heart of the stranger because you were once a stranger in the land of Egypt.
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