Register »
Get the best of Chabad.org content every week!
Find answers to fascinating Jewish questions, enjoy holiday tips and guides, read real-life stories and more!
ב"ה

Yisroel Shmotkin

Authors » S » Yisroel Shmotkin
Sort by:
Does it really matter when I light Shabbat candles? So what if I light them a bit later than sundown, like say when we sit down to dinner?
Everyone is aware of the Rebbe’s great leadership and his vast effort to revitalize and elevate the prestige of Judaism among Jews everywhere. However, not everyone is aware of the Rebbe’s greatness as a Torah scholar.
One outstanding characteristic of the Rebbe was his hiskashrus - his deep bond and utter dedication - to his own Rebbe, his sainted father-in-law, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn of righteous memory, the sixth Lubavitcher Rebbe.
From the very start, the Rebbe steered the world Jewish consciousness to the orientation of redemption – true tikkun olam and awareness of Moshiach – undertaking the most daring mission of all: to bring the world toward the era of Moshiach and redemption ...
The pain of every individual was his pain, and the joys of every individual were his joy. No one was dispensable. Everyone belonged and everyone counted.
Decades before the Jewish community realized the need to do so the Rebbe called upon rabbis, Jewish leaders, teachers and individuals of all stripes, to reach out to the youth and the unaffiliated. By the time the Jewish community came to grips with the t...
From the very beginning of his leadership, the Rebbe called for deeds. Thoughts and intentions are good and important, he explained, but if they do not yield concrete results then the essence is missing
From his deportment one could intuit little about his inner joy, pain or agony. However, the Rebbe’s consummate modesty was matched by his sensitivity.
There is no difference between what appears to be a more prestigious role in the service of G‑d and a menial, seemingly lesser, function – they both bring about the fulfillment of G‑d’s desire.
The Rebbe viewed the world’s diverse components as part of a single whole – a whole that is vastly greater than the sum of its parts. There is no fragmentation. The function of every element affects the entirety.
Browse Authors Alphabetically:
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T U V W Y Z