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Upsherin

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Upsherin: (Yiddish, lit. "to cut off"); traditional first haircut of a little boy when he turns three
A Three-Year-Old Jewish Boy's First Haircut
For the first three years of life, children absorb their parents’ love. Then, their education takes a leap—they are ready to produce and share their unique gifts. For a Jewish boy, this transition is marked with a haircutting ceremony—an “upsherin” (also ...
A Boy's First Haircut
At the age of three, children’s education takes a leap—they are now ready to produce and share their unique gifts. For a Jewish boy, this transition is traditionally marked with a haircutting ceremony.
On the third Jewish birthday of a Jewish boy, friends and community members are invited to a festive haircutting ceremony called an upshernish or chalakah.
A Child’s Upsherin
When I got my haircut, it was an experience. But for Jacob, it was an event. I had a professional cut my hair. He had his family and friends contribute . . .
Musings from the mother of a newly “upsherined” boy
Then it was haircut time. I squeezed my eyes shut, half expecting the same cries I heard at his bris, which seems like it was just yesterday. But when I looked up, he was grinning.
The custom of celebrating a boy’s first haircut has been around for hundreds of years, at least.
The custom of celebrating a boy’s first haircut has been around for hundreds of years, at least.
The primary purpose of the hair cutting is for the intention of leaving and essentially revealing the Peyot/sidelocks.
The primary purpose of the hair cutting is for the intention of leaving and essentially revealing the Peyot/sidelocks.
The Mitzvah of Peyos
This class explores the reasons and sources for the custom of celebrating a Jewish boy’s first haircut – an Upsherin.
A Boy’s First Haircut
An Upsherin is the traditional “first haircut” ceremony held on a boy’s third birthday. This ceremony marks the start of the child’s formal education, and is highlighted by leaving the child’s payot, and his starting to wear a kippah and tzitzit.
Education is, and always has been, the key to Jewish survival. But the essence of education is the imparting of values, not information.
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