The Temple Menorah

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The Temple Menorah: The seven-branched gold candelabra in the Temple.
The deeper meaning behind the different opinions in the Talmud and commentaries regarding the menorah’s spatial alignment inside the Temple, and regarding the identity of its miraculous “western lamp.”
We can inspire our children, or teach them to inspire themselves. We can be their wings, or teach them to fly.
Why is the section dealing with the Menorah placed next to the section dealing with [the dedication offerings of] the leaders?
As anyone who has ever battled a coal barbeque or labored to start a campfire without fire-starters or kerosene would attest, there is more to kindling than just holding a match to the fuel
A lesson from the seven-branched menorah: You don’t have to be a carbon copy of somebody else to be a good Jew. The critical issue is, are you kindled?
"There are seventy facets of the Torah" say the Talmud. Here are three perspectives on the Menorah in the Holy Temple
The Anatomy of a Flame
The menorah, its lamps, and the flames they hold are the very mirror of our identity as a people, the way we interact with each other, and of the elemental strivings of the human soul
In this week’s parshah, Bahaalotecha, we read about the menorah. First, it tells us how Aaron, the High Priest, should light the menorah. “When you kindle [literally “raise”] the lamps, the seven lights should be made to shine towards the center of the me...
"It was just funny, because it still felt like Mr. Benson was teaching the class. If you would ask me who taught the Sedra this week, I would say Mr. Benson, even though he wasn't there."
By law, the menorah stood in a chamber into which only kohanim (priests) were permitted entry. But the law also states that an ordinary person may light the menorah. What is the point—and lesson—of this legal paradox?
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