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A Look at the Past, Present and Future of German Jewry
Former President of the Central Council for Jews in Germany and Holocaust Survivor, Dr. Charlotte Knobloch, describes the current state of the German Jewish community, its past and where it is heading.
I arrived at the Chabad House in Munich and its co-director Chanie Diskin's apartment on Thursday morning to the distinctive smell of gefilte fish simmering on the stove.
1510
In 1509, Emperor Maximilian of Germany ordered that all Jewish books in the cities of Cologne and Frankfurt am Main be destroyed. This followed the request of Pfefferkorn, a baptized Jew, who claimed that Jewish literature was insulting to Christianity. T...
1096
At the end of a week in which a group Jews took refuge in a local castle in Worms, Germany, the crusaders massacred them during their morning prayers. (see "Today in Jewish History" for Iyar 8.)
1096
In the early 1070s, the Muslim Turks commenced an offensive against the Christian pilgrims in Jerusalem. Pope Gregory VII offered his help to defend the Greek Christians, but the army he promised never materialized. In 1095, his successor, Urban II, began...
1945
In Rheims, France, the Chief-of-Staff of the German Armed Forces High Command signed the unconditional surrender documents for all German forces to the Allies, thus marking the official end of World War II in Europe. The surrender took place following a f...
1933
Following the rise of the Nazi Party in Germany in the year 1933, the Nazis burned thousands of books written by Jews—and others deemed "Un-German"—on the 14 of Iyar of that year.
1510
1,500 Jewish books were confiscated in Frankfurt am Main, Germany at the instigation of an apostate (Meshumad) on the 11th of Iyar.
Celebrating a grand menorah lighting with Germany’s president at Brandenburg Gate, eighty years after Kristallnacht.
Bringing the light of Chanukah to the darkest of places.
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