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Omer Offering, The

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Omer Offering, The: (lit. a biblical measure of approx. 43 oz.) the formal counting of the 49 days from the second day of Passover -- when the Omer offering was brought in the Holy Temple -- to the eve of Shavuot, signifying our preparation for the receiving of the Torah on the holiday of Shavuot.
Counting of the Omer
Between the holidays of Passover and Shavuot, the Omer is counted each evening, signifying our preparation for the receiving of the Torah on the holiday of Shavuot. Your one-stop site for an enhanced Omer experience.
And what does it have to do with counting to Shavuot?
Contemporary Jews associate the Omer with the mitzvah of Sefirat Haomer, counting the days from the second day of Passover until the holiday of Shavuot. In truth, the Omer is the name of a special offering that was brought on the second day of Passover. A...
Grain from a newly planted crop (Chadash) may not be consumed prior to the offering of the ‘Omer’ in the Temple on the second day of Passover. No grain of the new crop may be brought to the Temple as an offering prior to the ‘Two Loaves’ offered on Shavou...
The underlying principles of the mitzvah of Sefirat HaOmer
This presentation pioneers a novel approach to understanding the underlying principles of the biblical commandment to “Count the Omer.” Following the initial point of departure; demonstrating the need to frame the “counting” as a continuation and natural ...
Parshat Emor
A deeper look at the counting of the Omer, and the distinctive laws governing the Omer offering and the Shavuot offering. (Based on Likkutei Sichos, vol. 32, p. 134.)
Chassidic teachings unveil the pathology of “spirituality without sacrifice” through a fascinating halachic analysis. It revolves around the issue of kosher grain.
This class explains in detail the mitzvah of the Omer offering which marks the beginning of the seven-week period of ‘the counting of the Omer’.
We are inclined to believe that all intellectual and artistic endeavors are inherently positive. There are those who would argue that untrammeled intellectual and artistic expression is itself a fundamental good . . .
The Omer offering is brought on the second day of Pesach and the Shtei Halechem offering is brought on Shavuot; what do their differences represent according to Kabbalah?
By counting the Omer, we elicit a divine response from Above.
By counting the Omer, we elicit a divine response from Above.
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