Kohen Gadol

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Kohen Gadol: the “high priest,” or chief of the Kohanim; only he may enter the Holy of Holies
Question: When the third Holy Temple is built—may it be soon—how, and by what criteria, will the new high priest be chosen? Answer: Before we discuss the appointment of the high priest with the coming of Moshiach, let’s first discuss the nature of this ex...
ומלוין אותו עד ביתו “All the people accompanied him to his house.” QUESTION: Why, upon the completion of the services did he go specifically to his house? ANSWER: The Gemara (Yoma 2a) says, “Seven days before Yom Kippur they sequester the Kohen Gadol from...
Transcending Inner Conflict on the Holiest Day of the Year
Yom Kippur and the Real You
One of the emotional peaks of the Yom Kippur prayer service is a description of the ceremony performed by the High Priest in the Holy Temple.
Parshat Korach
Who Was Korach?
Korach led a mutiny to usurp the position of kohen gadol (high priest) for himself. What did Korach understand—and misunderstand—about the greatness of serving G‑d as the high priest?
Some religious doctrines see marriage as a concession to human weakness. Nothing could be further from Jewish thought . . .
Every Jewish person is a potential temple for G‑d, and every individual is the serving high priest in his or her personal temple. The goal of the Yom Kippur prayer service is to access the Holy of Holies of this temple...
The Mishkan as a prototype of time, space and man
13 chapters are filled with the details of the Sanctuary's construction, from the dimensions of its pillars to the colors of its tapestries. In contrast, the Torah devotes one chapter to its account of the creation and three chapters to the revelation at ...
The Talmud relates the following conversation between "a heretic" and the sage Rabbi Avahu: "Your G-d is a Kohen," said the heretic. "So in what did He immerse Himself after He buried Moses?" Replied Rabbi Avahu: "He immersed in fire." An examination of t...
Beyond life spans a vast stillness. But as long as we live and strive, sound denotes activity, activity denotes movement, and movement denotes a discrepancy between where we are and where we want to be . . .
The two great Torah commentaries of Rashi and Nachmanides debate the arrangement of the bells and pomegranates on the edge of the high priest’s robe. The Rebbe sees this as a discussion on the nature of noise, imperfection and superficiality.
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