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Human Being, The

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"Hey, Danny, check out my muscles! You think you're the strongest? Well, you sure are mistaken!" Danny howled with laughter. "Ben, give me a break… You don't know what muscles are!..."
First G‑d declares His love for the Jew. Only then does He express the desire for something to be done. In G‑d’s books, it turns out, pleasure comes before business.
I’m pathetically biased, but I embrace my bias. I feel sated with pride, although my children haven’t done anything uniquely successful or unusually brilliant—not yet. I wonder: is this the way G‑d feels towards us?
Why does the book devoted to mitzvot start with the laws of sacrifices? Perhaps they encapsulate the inner meaning of mitzvot more than any other individual mitzvah . . .
Why, if a person sinned and wished to make atonement, or he was just in a generous mood and wished to offer something to G‑d, does he sacrifice an innocent animal? Why doesn’t he sacrifice himself, for example?
For the Haftarah of Vayikra, From the Teachings of the Rebbe
This haftarah is special in that it gets you feeling that G‑d loves and wants us.
It wasn’t always this way. Until relatively recently, fat was considered a delicacy.
The commandment to place salt on every sacrifice is repeated three times. Why so much emphasis?
We are taking those very same character defects that drove us far from G‑d and giving them right back to Him to do with as He pleases. It's not for us to try and determine which parts of us G‑d has use for.
As parents, we obviously believe that genuine self-esteem is important to our children’s psychological and spiritual development. But how can we avoid the hubris and laziness that invariably accompany an inflated self-image?
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