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Edot, Chukim & Mishpatim

Knowledge Base » Torah, The » Mitzvah; Mitzvot » Edot, Chukim & Mishpatim
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Chukim (21)
Mishpatim (11)
Edot (2)
This is the parshah that deals with the Parah Adumah (Red Heifer). For those of you who are unfamiliar with the Parah Adumah, I’ll try very briefly to summarize the main points. In Yiddishkeit, spiritual purity is a desirable factor. This has nothing to d...
The Torah was first given carved in stone and then transcribed with ink upon a parchment scroll. What is the deeper significance of these two forms of Torah?
Our Sages differentiate between the rational mitzvot (mishpatim) and the supra-rational mitzvot (chukim); a third, intermediate category are the "testimonial" or commemorative mitzvot (eidot). But in essence, says the Rebbe, the most rational mishpat is a...
Parshat Mishpatim begins, "And these are the laws that ‘tasim’ [you shall set] ‘lifnayhem’ [before them]." Exodus 21:1. On the word lifnayhem, there are several different explanations. One of the explanations of the Talmud Talmud, Gittin 88b. is brought b...
Demanding obedience is a card parents often pull as leverage in a power struggle. But have the children learned anything meaningful?
This class explains the significance of the logical and mundane laws of the Torah and the special connection of these mitzvot to the general theme of the giving of the Torah.
The blood-sprinkling ceremony on the altar seems particularly bizarre. Gentlemen, please help me to understand why this practice should sound like a good thing to me!
Our parshah opens with a listing of moral and civil laws. It really seems odd that the awesome revelation on Mt. Sinai should be followed by laws that any just nation would follow.
In order to get some intimation of the Infinite One Who is beyond all conception, the mind naturally fills in what is inconceivable with ideas that are logical and comprehensible. A still deeper appreciation of Infinity thus requires a certain hollowing o...
In praise of tribal rituals
Keeping kosher is not a reasonable act, and neither is Shabbat, or the prohibition against mixing wool and linen. These are neither rational nor religious acts—at least not in the modern understanding of “religious” . . .
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