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Tzvi Freeman

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Let's all leave ourselves behind this Passover
In denial, we humans are the oblivious jackhammer at the symphony, pounding away at the foundations of our environment, ripping the very fibers of the cosmic order.
Another thing about your kosher inner animal: Having a split hoof means it points in two directions at once. That's important. Because if you want your animal to shine, never let it go in just one direction. It has to go to the right—to reach out to other...
Your mind is like a bird. Let it be and it will fly out any window into the great blue sky. The Torah doesn't provide any signs to determine if a bird is kosher. It just provides us a list of birds that we must not eat--most of them predators. Over the ag...
If you want your inner animal to stay kosher, chew your cud well. Don't let the stuff growing on the ground enter into your life without multiple ruminations. First, ask, "Do I need to do this for my purpose in life?" Then, once that question is answered,...
The second thing a kosher inner animal requires is a split in its hooves—all the way through, down to the ground. . There's got to be some light shining where your feet touch the ground. Which means: When you look at the earth, and all the earthly things ...
Any animal that has a cloven hoof that is completely split into double hooves, and which brings up its cud —that one you may eat. (Leviticus 11:3) All of us have an animal inside. We have a divine soul, as well, a breath of G‑d within. But a divine soul i...
On Purim, it’s a mitzvah to hear the story of Esther read from a scroll—called a “megillah”—both by day and by night. The Talmud tells us, “If you read the story backwards, you haven’t read the story.” (Megillah 2a.) Of course, that means you have to read...
The word Purim is from the Persian word pur, a means of gambling. Because Haman believed that all of life is a gamble. G‑d threw a roll of dice, he said, and the world was made. Another roll—good was chosen to be good and bad to be evil. So Haman threw hi...
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