In this week’s Torah portion we read how the spies sent to explore the Land of Canaan reported that “there we saw the giants . . . and we were in our own eyes as locusts, and so we were in their eyes.” (Numbers 13:33).

We were in our own eyes as locusts—and thus, “so we were in their eyes.” How another person sees us depends on how we see ourselves.

Our sages insist that “nothing can stand in the way of will.” If we want something enough, we will find the resources to carry it out. If we realize our own capabilities and talents, another person will also see them. If, on the other hand, we see ourselves as something insignificant and worthless, to be trampled on, how can we expect others to see us any differently?

This is not to be confused with egotism or pride. It is not about bragging or self-aggrandizement. It is about recognizing who we are and what we are capable of—specifically, with regard to our Judaism and our Jewish practice—and that nothing can stand in our way unless we allow it to. It all depends on how we see ourselves.