More than 4,000 people lined both sides of Los Angeles’ central Pico Boulevard Sunday for a Jewish unity parade and concert in celebration of the mystical springtime holiday of Lag B’Omer.

Featuring a marching band, clowns, and colorful floats built by local schools and organizations, the Unity Street Fair and Concert brought men, women and children of all ages to the city’s Schneerson Square, site of the Bais Chaya Mushka Chabad girls school. The celebration echoed hundreds of others in Jewish communities around the world.

“Today, we celebrate Jewish unity and our love for one another,” Rabbi Boruch Shlomo Cunin, director of West Coast Chabad-Lubavitch, told the crowd. “We are confident that our acts of goodness and kindness, love and unity will bring about the immediate redemption of the Jewish people.”

Always occurring 33 days after the start of Passover, the holiday of Lag B’Omer marks the passing of the second-century mystical sage Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai, who told his students that the day should be celebrated as the beginning of the dissemination of the Torah’s inner teachings.


Children participants of Sunday’s Unity Street Fair and Concert in Los Angeles lead a crowd of 4,000 people in the recitation of biblical verses in front of the Bais Chaya Mushka Chabad girls school.


Drawing men, women and children of all ages, the parade and concert echoed similar Lag B’Omer celebrations elsewhere in the world.


Always occurring 33 days after the start of Passover, the holiday of Lag B’Omer marks the passing of the second-century mystical sage Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai. Just before his passing, he told his students that the day should be marked by intense joy in recognition of the dissemination of the Torah’s mystical teachings.


Sunday’s parade route followed a section of Pico Boulevard towards Schneerson Square.


Clowns participated in the spectacle.


Designed by local schools and organizations, the floats focused on different Jewish themes. One of the floats highlighted the Jewish website Chabad.org.


A children’s marching band led the parade.


Another float illustrated various Torah commandments.


Two children performers dressed up as the second-century sage Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai and his son Rabbi Eleazar, who spent 13 years learning Torah in a cave while hiding from Roman authorities.


The festivities also included the dedication of a Torah scroll.


During the parade, Jewish children marched down the street in a show of unity.