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Tzimtzum as the Ground for Fichte's Account of Justice

Reciprocity and Normative Empowerment: Kabbalistic and Philosophical Sources

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Tzimtzum as the Ground for Fichte's Account of Justice: Reciprocity and Normative Empowerment: Kabbalistic and Philosophical Sources

How can kabbalistic and hasidic concepts be adapted into wider culture, including the realms of philosophy and policymaking? One example pointed to by Wexler, and before him Jürgen Habermas and Franz Rosensweig, is the influence of kabbalah on German Idealism, which is currently undergoing a revival. Via the 1677-84 publication of Kabbalah Denudata, the concept of Tzimtzum, whose purpose is recognitive reciprocity, was adapted by Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1762–1814) to provide a grounds for natural right, i.e. fundamental principles of justice.
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