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Sukkot with the Rebbe

7:17
During the festival of Sukkos, the Torah commands us to take a citron, a date palm frond, a myrtle branch, and a willow twig and bring them all together. The Midrash adds that each of these represents a different kind of Jew.
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5:55
The two central mitzvos of Sukkos, the sukkah and the Four Kinds, have at their core the theme of Jewish unity.
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7:59
An address to children on Sukkos: Unlike other nations, who parade with a rifle, a Jew parades with a lulav. And instead of bullets, a Jew arms himself with an esrog. Instead of brandishing daggers or swords, a Jew carries hadassim (myrtles) and aravos (willows).
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9:04
The Midrash teaches that each of the Four Species on Sukkos represents one kind of Jew and concludes: “On Sukkos, all four Jews must join together, for each one completes the others.”
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8:13
The sukkah is a testament to G‑d’s protection over the Jewish people. Like the clouds of glory in the desert, which it represents, the sukkah brings the nations of the world to respect the Jewish people and to recognize that this world has one true Master, G‑d Almighty. Thus, the coronation of G‑d which the Jewish people initiated on Rosh Hashana also reaches its apex on Sukkos, as all the nations of the world recognize G‑d’s dominion.
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6:37
During the Holiday of Sukkos, we take a palm branch, citron, and branches of myrtle and willow, and wave them together in every direction. In fact, it was the custom of our Rebbes that when waving the lulav, they would not only extended it forward and bring it back, but would move it out in each of the six directions, give it a shake, and then bring it back towards the chest.
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6:48
When the Holy Temple stood in Jerusalem, wine was poured on the altar daily, but on the festival of Sukkos there was an additional water libation after the morning service. The seven nights of Sukkos were spent celebrating the drawing of this water, which was collected daily at daybreak from a valley below the Temple. Water may lack all the sophistication of wine, but it is for this reason that our sages associate it with Torah, unity and joy.
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7:11
The Four Species taken on Sukkos represent four types of Jews, from the citron which has both flavor and fragrance, and represents the Jew who studies Torah and fulfills its commandments, to the willow which is neither tasty nor fragrant, represents the simplest of Jews, who lacks both Torah and good deeds.
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6:15
During their sojourn in the desert, G-d protected the Jewish people against danger and the elements with the Clouds of Glory, which the Torah refers to as “sukkahs”. To commemorate this, He commanded us to observe the holiday of Sukkos, when we spend a week in temporary huts.
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7:17
The seventh day of Sukkos is known as Hoshana Raba, during which we fulfill the custom of making seven circuits around the bima while holding the Four Species and reciting prayers for blessing and prosperity in the coming year.
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8:00
The yahrzeit of the Rebbe Maharash, the fourth Chabad Rebbe, falls just before Sukkos, a time when Jews busily prepare for the upcoming festival. In recalling his life’s work, we see how the Rebbe Maharash gave up personal comforts, working tirelessly to improve the spiritual and physical lives of Russian Jewry.
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7:29
The Talmud relates that the entire Jewish people could dwell in one sukkah.
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2:48
A group of Chassidim representing Chabad communities around the world, along with members of the Rebbe’s secretariat, are invited into the Rebbe’s study, to choose for themselves the Four Species for the upcoming Festival. (Late 1970s)
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2:22
The Rebbe inspects lulavim and distributes them to a number of distinguished individuals, concluding with a blessing for good and joyful tidings throughout the year.
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During Chol Hamoed Sukkos, the Rebbe shares his Four Species with the Chasidim.
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A vintage scene from morning services in 770 during the festival of Sukkos. (5720s - 1960s)
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The Rebbe chooses palm branch, willows and myrtles for his set of Four Species for Sukkos.
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1:33
21 Tishrei, 5742 • October 18, 1981
Distribution of Lekach, honeycake, with wishes for a sweet New Year. This is an age-old tradition on Hosha’ana Rabah. The Rebbe hands Lekach to men, women and children of all walks of life.
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2:33
A special collage featuring scenes of the Rebbe distributing lekach, or honey cake, for a sweet new year.
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3:02
Reciting Hallel with the Four Kinds during the intermediate days of Sukkos. (October, 1978)
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During the Morning Prayers on Hoshana Rabba, the Rebbe waves the Four Species during Hallel and circles the Bimah for Hoshanos.
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2:42
The Rebbe takes part in the services of Hoshana Rabbah.
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1:46
A special video montage of the morning prayers on Hoshana Rabbah, including the Rebbe reciting Hallel and waving the Four Species.
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Reciting the Book of Psalms on the Eve of Hoshana Rabba.
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1:29
3rd day of Chol Hamoed Sukkos, 5741 • September 29, 1980
“And you shall rejoice in your Festival… and you will be only happy.” (Deuteronomy 16:14, 15)
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1:20
3rd Day of Chol Hamoed Sukkos, 5741 • September 29, 1980
“He struck the rock and water flowed.” The verse tells how, in the desert, G-d commanded Moses to hit the rock with his staff. Water flowed forth from it to satisfy the thirst of the Jewish people. From the Prayer for Rain.
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For many years, Rabbi Yitzchak Maier Gurary and his father-in-law, Rabbi Mordechai Altein, would provide the Four Species to the Rebbe for Sukkos.
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Rabbi Menachem Teichtel was a refugee student in Vichy France during the war. He recounts just how far the Rebbe was willing to go to uphold a Jewish custom during wartime (circa 1940).
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5:21
In the late 1950s, When Rabbi Nachman Elbaum raised the issue of using an esrog from a tree that had been grafted, the Rebbe gave him a solution and a mission. The result was a new orchard in the village of Kfar Chabad, Israel.
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6:35
Rabbi Binyomin Silberstrom recalls asking the Rebbe, “How can we spread joy during the festival Sukkos when it won’t stop raining? The Talmud clearly states that rain is a sign of God’s displeasure.” The quick reply to his question was was a revealing example of the Rebbe’s unique perspective. (1975)
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