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Practical Halachah: Cooking on Shabbat, Part 5

Leaving a Pot on the Fire for Shabbat

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Practical Halachah: Cooking on Shabbat, Part 5: Leaving a Pot on the Fire for Shabbat

In this class we examine the laws of cooking on Shabbat related to the rabbinic prohibition of ‘shehiya’ (regulations for leaving a pot on the fire before Shabbat). This encompasses the requirement of using a ‘blech’ (a sheet of metal) to cover the fire beneath the pots. Learn the practical application for using hotplates and crockpots, leaving food in an oven, and the three areas on the blech that are of differing halachic status.
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Shabbat, Halacha, Shehiya

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3 Comments
Shaul Wolf Chabad.org August 5, 2015

Re: The problem with putting food on a fire before Shabbat is not the cooking itself, rather it is the concern that one might stoke the coals (raise the temperature of the stove) in order to hasten the cooking process, thus violating the Melacha of kindling.
There are two ways to avoid this issue:
1) If the food is somewhat cooked: There is no concern that the coals will be stoked because the food will surely become fully cooked before the nighttime meal.
2) If one adds an entirely raw piece of meat at the onset of Shabbat: There is no concern that the coals will be stoked being that stoking them will not help to have the meat ready before the nighttime meal, and it will be cooked regardless in time for the next day. Reply

Michael Friedman Morrisburg August 3, 2015

Practical Halachah: Cooking on Shabbat, Part 4 Tov me'od ! Reply

Degel Texas August 3, 2015

Please explain I am not sure I understood what is the law says about a piece of meat, that you can put on fire right before Shabbath. You cannot cook it for Friday night but you can leave it for cooking over night? I am totally confused. Prolong cooking is not consider as milacha? Reply

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