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Kabbalah and the Bible

In-Depth Study of the Weekly Torah Portion

Selected verses from the weekly portion are studied with classic commentaries and chassidic insights.

1:08:38
Torah Portion of Balak
An in-depth analysis of some of the most unusual prophecies ever known to humankind!
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1:04:12
This class explains in detail the mitzvah of the Omer offering which marks the beginning of the seven-week period of ‘the counting of the Omer’.
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59:14
Kabbalah and the Bible – Tazria-Metzora
Tzaraat is a supernatural skin discoloration which signifies ritual impurity. The declaration and diagnosis of tzaraat is only through the kohen, why?
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1:03:23
Kabbalah and the Bible - Ki Tisa
Less than forty days after experiencing divine revelation at Sinai, the Jewish people sin in worshiping the golden calf. It seems inexplicable that they completely deny G-d after all they had just experienced.
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45:00
Studying Rashi: Parshat Devarim
“The Lord, your G-d has multiplied you, and you are today as numerous as the stars in the sky.” (Deuteronomy 1:10) Were there really as many Jews on that day as stars in the sky? Is this an exaggeration or perhaps a metaphor? Rashi explains why the Jews are compared to the celestial bodies.
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1:16:59
Studying Rashi: Parshat Va'etchanan
The Torah describes the revelation at Sinai by saying: "You have been shown, in order to know that the Lord He is G-d; there is none else besides Him." (Deuteronomy 4:35) Rashi explains that the way G-d showed the people is that "He tore open the heaven and earth." How are we to understand this unusual imagery?
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1:10:31
Studying Rashi: Parshat Re'eh
In verse 12:17, the Torah says: "You cannot eat within your cities the tithe of your grain...or any of your vows that you will vow..." Rashi clarifies that it does not mean "you cannot" but rather "you are not allowed to." What is the difference between being able and being allowed to do something?
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52:17
Studying Rashi: Parshat Shoftim
The Torah says (Deut. 18:13) "Be wholehearted with your G-d" in contrast to those who seek fortune tellers and other ways of knowing the future. Rashi explains that G-d doesn't want us to probe the future, but to simply accept whatever comes. But aren't we supposed to be proactive? Doesn't G-d expect us to do our part as well? How is this to be understood?
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1:10:33
Studying Rashi: Parshat Ki-Teitzei
The Torah says that fulfilling the mitzvah of shiluach hakan (sending away the mother bird from the nest) brings long life. Rashi says that if such an "easy" mitzvah brings long life, it may be inferred that every mitzvah brings long life as well.
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1:04:22
Studying Rashi: Parshat Ki-Tavo
On the final day of Moses' life, he tells the Jewish nation, “You have now been given a heart to know, and eyes to see.” (Deuteronomy 29:3) Rashi explains that only at this point was Israel able to “recognize G-d's kindness.” How is it possible that throughout forty years of miracles, the Jewish nation didn't appreciate what had happened to then until that day?
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