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Tales of Light

The Talmud on Chanukah

This three-part Talmud series will be exploring the second chapter of tractate Shabbat, analyzing the nature of the miracle of the “jug of oil” and the Talmudic debate on the precise amount of candles required to be lit each of the eight days of Chanukah.

The Jug of Oil
Audio | 1:01:19
The Jug of Oil
The Talmud on Chanukah, Lesson 1
This class will be analyzing the Talmud’s description of the Chanukah miracle, and offer three ways to understand the miracle of the “jug of oil” that burnt throughout the eight days of Chanukah.
One to Eight or Eight to One?
The Talmud on Chanukah, Lesson 2
This class will be examining the Talmud’s discussion on how many Chanukah lights should be kindled on each night of Chanukah. Explore the different opinions and possibilities and their respective reasoning. If you think it’s simple, then it may be a lot more nuanced than you imagine.
Striving for Greater Heights
The Talmud on Chanukah, Lesson 3
This class will be analyzing the Talmud’s two opinions into the reasoning for the amount of lights one kindles on each night of Chanukah. A closer look at the reasons offered, reveals three practical ramifications between these two perspectives. There’s more to the story of the Chanukah flames…
What Quality Oil for the Menorah?
The Talmud on Chanukah, Lesson 4
The Talmud addresses whether inferior quality oil and wicks may be used for kindling the Chanukah menorah. We learn how this debated law depends on other disputed principles in the mitzvah of lighting the menorah.
Behind the Blessings
The Talmud on Chanukah, Lesson 5
In this class we learn the Talmud’s discussion on the preferred oil for lighting the menorah, and then proceed to scrutinize the blessings for the Chanukah menorah.
Two Menorahs for One Person?
The Talmud on Chanukah, Lesson 6
The Talmud presents an interesting scenario where one person must light two menorahs. This teaches us a new principle on avoiding suspicion. In perfect Talmudic style, the discussion turns to the mitzvah of leaving ‘Pie’ah’ (the corner of the field for the poor) to support this idea.
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