1

[We should adhere to the following procedure when] no rain at all has descended from the beginning of the rainy season onward: If the seventeenth of Marcheshvan arrives and no rains have descended, the Torah scholars should begin to fast, [starting on] a Monday [and continuing on] the [following] Thursday, and the [following] Monday. All students [of the Torah] are fit to accept these [fasts] upon themselves.

א

הרי שלא ירדו להם גשמים כל עיקר מתחלת ימות הגשמים. אם הגיע י"ז במרחשון ולא ירדו גשמים מתחילין תלמידי חכמים בלבד להתענות שני וחמישי ושני. וכל התלמידים ראויין לכך:

[We should adhere to the following procedure when] no rain at all has descended from the beginning of the rainy season onward: - Ta'anit 6a relates that the rainy season in Eretz Yisrael begins in the month of Marcheshvan. The third of the month is considered to be the earliest time rain can be expected to descend.

In other lands, such fasts should be held when, ע"ל, they are necessary according to the local needs and climate (Halachah 10; Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim 575:9).

If the seventeenth of Marcheshvan arrives and no rains have descended - The rains have already been delayed. To hasten the manifestation of Divine blessing

the Torah scholars should begin to fast - and repent. Nevertheless, the situation is not serious enough to alarm the people at large.

[starting on] a Monday - i.e., the Monday closest to the seventeenth of Marcheshvan, for, as explained in Chapter 1, Halachah 5, a series of communal fasts should always begin on a Monday.

[and continuing on] the [following] Thursday, and the [following] Monday. - These fasts begin at dawn; work, anointing oneself, wearing shoes, and sexual relations are permitted.

The Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chayim 575:1) emphasizes that these fasts are considered individual fasts and not communal fasts.

All students [of the Torah] are fit to accept these [fasts] upon themselves. - At certain times, ordinary students are advised to refrain from accepting stringencies intended for the Torah sages, lest they appear overly proud. In this instance, however, Ta'anit 10b suggests that all students of the Torah accept these fasts if possible.

2

If Rosh Chodesh Kislev arrives without the rains having descended, the court should decree three communal fasts, [starting on] a Monday, [and continuing on] the [following] Thursday, and the [following] Monday. It is permitted to eat and drink at night. The men serving in the [weekly] priestly watch should not fast with them because they are involved in the Temple service.

On these days, the entire people should enter the synagogue, pray, cry out [to God], and make supplications as is customary on all fasts.

ב

הגיע ראש חודש כסליו ולא ירדו גשמים בית דין גוזרין שלש תעניות על הצבור שני חמישי ושני. ומותרין בהן לאכול ולשתות בלילה. ואנשי משמר אין מתענין עמהן מפני שהן עסוקין בעבודה. וכל העם נכנסים לבתי כנסיות ומתפללין וזועקין ומתחננין כדרך שעושין בכל התעניות:

If Rosh Chodesh Kislev arrives without the rains having descended - The drought is considered serious enough to warrant that

the court should decree three communal fasts, [starting on] a Monday - If, however, Rosh Chodesh Kislev itself falls on a Monday, the fast is not held until the Monday of the following week.

[and continuing on] the [following] Thursday, and the [following] Monday. - As mentioned in Chapter 1, Halachah 5, when necessary the court ordains a series of three fasts to evoke Divine favor.

It is permitted to eat and drink at night - until dawn, or until one goes to sleep. (See Chapter 1, Halachah 8.)

The men serving in the [weekly] priestly watch - See Hilchot Klei Hamikdash 3:9, which states that the prophet Samuel and King David ordained 24 priestly watches, which rotated in the Temple service. Each week, a different watch would serve.

should not fast with them, because they are involved in the Temple service. - This leniency includes even the members of the families who are not obligated to serve in the Temple on that day, for many sacrifices may be brought unexpectedly and they may be called to assist in the service. Were they to be fasting, they would not be able to perform this service properly (Ta'anit 2:6).

On these days, the entire people should enter the synagogue, pray, cry out [to God] - i.e., the prayer Anenu is recited in the Shemoneh Esreh, and other supplicatory prayers are recited.

and make supplications as is customary on all fasts. - The trumpets, however, are not sounded.

3

If these [fasts] pass without [their prayers] being answered, the court should decree an additional three communal fasts. On these fasts, we eat and drink while it is still day [on the day before the fast], as on the fast of Yom Kippur.

The men serving in the [weekly] priestly watch should fast for part of the day, but should not complete the fast. The men of the beit av - those individuals who are involved in the Temple service that day - should not fast at all.

On a fast for which we are required to cease eating while it is still day, once a person has ceased eating and decided not to eat any more, he may not change his mind and eat, even though there is still time during the day.

ג

עברו אלו ולא נענו בית דין גוזרין שלש תעניות אחרות על הצבור שני וחמישי ושני. ובשלש אלו אוכלין ושותין מבעוד יום כמו שעושין בצום כפור. ואנשי משמר מתענין מקצת היום ולא משלימין. ואנשי בית אב והם העוסקין בעבודה באותו היום לא יהיו מתענים כל עיקר. וכל תענית שאוכלין בה מבעוד יום אם אכל ופסק וגמר שלא לאכול אינו חוזר ואוכל אף על פי שיש שהות ביום:

If these [fasts] pass without [their prayers] being answered - By choosing this wording (quoted from Ta'anit 1:6), the Rambam teaches us a lesson in the service of God. It could have said, "If these fasts pass without rain having descended." The Rambam and the Mishnah, however, want to emphasize that the ultimate reason why rain descends or does not descend is not dependent on natural factors, but rather on God's mercies.

the court should decree an additional three communal fasts - of a more severe nature.

There are some texts of the Mishneh Torah that read "[starting on] a Monday, [and continuing on] the [following] Thursday, and the [following] Monday," and other texts read "[starting on] Thursday, [and continuing on] the [following] Monday, and the [following] Thursday."

The difference between these two versions depends on the difference of opinion mentioned in the commentary on Chapter 1, Halachah 5, concerning the question: Should the second series of fasts begin on a Thursday or not?

On these fasts, we eat and drink while it is still day [on the day before the fast], as on the fast of Yom Kippur. - I.e., as on Yom Kippur, we are forbidden to eat and drink after sunset. The Magen Avraham 575:2, however, explains that unlike Yom Kippur (Hilchot Sh'vitat Esor 1:6), there is no obligation to begin the fast before sunset.

The men serving in the [weekly] priestly watch should fast for part of the day - because these fasts are more severe and also because, at the beginning of the day, it was less likely that they be called to assist in the Temple service

but should not complete the fast - lest they become weak and be unable to serve in the Temple when called.

The men of the beit av - those individuals who are involved in the Temple service that day - should not fast at all - for the above reason.

On a fast for which we are required to cease eating while it is still day, once a person has ceased eating - concluded his meal

and decided not to eat any more - for this is considered as if he accepted the fast upon himself

he may not change his mind and eat, even though there is still time during the day. - The Ramban and the Maggid Mishneh differ with the Rambam on this point and maintain that as long as one has not made an explicit statement to the fact that one has accepted the fast, one is allowed to change one's mind and eat. The rationale for their ruling is that, as explained above, on these fasts, in contrast to Yom Kippur, there is no obligation to begin the fast before sunset.

With regard to the laws of Tish'ah B'Av - and from there we can extrapolate to the instance at hand - the Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chayim 553:1) accepts the Ramban's ruling. The Mishneh Berurah 553:2, however, states that a mental resolve to accept the fast is also sufficient to cause one to be forbidden to eat further.

4

On these three fasts, all people are forbidden to perform work during the day, but they are permitted during the [previous] night. It is forbidden for a person to wash his entire body in hot water, but one may wash one's face, hands, and feet. For this reason, the bathhouses are closed.

It is forbidden to anoint oneself. One may, however, do so to remove filth. Sexual relations are forbidden, as is wearing shoes in a city. One may, however, wear shoes on a journey. We pray in the synagogues, cry out [to God], and make supplications as is customary on all fasts.

ד

בשלש תעניות אלו כל העם אסורין בעשיית מלאכה ביום ומותרין בלילה. ואסורין ברחיצת כל הגוף בחמין אבל פניו ידיו ורגליו מותר לפיכך נועלין את המרחצאות. ואסורין בסיכה. ואם להעביר את הזוהמא מותר. ואסורין בתשמיש המטה. ובנעילת הסנדל בעיר אבל בדרך מותר לנעול. ומתפללין בבתי כנסיות וזועקין ומתחננין כשאר תעניות:

On these three fasts, all people are forbidden - As the Rambam mentions in Chapter 1, Halachah 4, all the fasts mentioned in this text are Rabbinic in origin. The only fast mentioned in the Torah is Yom Kippur. Accordingly, when the Sages instituted communal fasts, they used Yom Kippur as a paradigm. Therefore, just as it is forbidden to perform work, wash, anoint oneself, engage in sexual relations, or wear shoes on that holy day, these activities were also forbidden on other fast days.

Nevertheless, on fast days other than Yom Kippur, certain leniencies were instituted, and these restrictions were not enforced to the same degree as on Yom Kippur.

to perform work during the day - Ta'anit 12b brings support for this concept from the exegesis of Joel 2:15: "Sanctify the fast day; call an assembly, and collect the elders." The word for "assembly," עצרה, resembles the Biblical name for the holiday of Shavuot, עצרת. Just as it is forbidden to work on Shavuot, so too, it is forbidden to work on a fast day.

but they are permitted during the [previous] night. - Ta'anit, ibid., continues using exegesis to show that, in contrast to Shavuot, working on the night of a fast day is permitted.

It is forbidden for a person to wash his entire body in hot water - but one may wash one's body with cold water (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim 575:3).

but one may wash one's face, hands, and feet - even in hot water (loc. cit.).

For this reason, the bathhouses are closed - to ensure that this prohibition is observed.

It is forbidden to anoint oneself - for the sake of pleasure.

One may, however, do so to remove filth - or for medicinal reasons (Mishnah Berurah 575:7).

Sexual relations are forbidden - This applies even on the night of a woman's ritual immersion (Mishnah Berurah 575:8).

as is wearing shoes in a city. One may, however, wear shoes on a journey - for making a journey without proper shoes is extremely uncomfortable.

We pray in the synagogues - As opposed to the following sequence of fasts, whose prayer services are held in the streets of the city, as explained in Chapter 4.

cry out [to God], and make supplications as is customary on all fasts. - The trumpets, however, are not sounded.

5

If these [fasts] pass without [their prayers] being answered, the court decrees another seven communal fasts, [beginning on the next] Monday, [and continuing as follows]: Thursday, Monday, Thursday, Monday, Thursday, and Monday.

It is only on these seven fasts1 that pregnant and nursing women2 are required to fast. [On the other fast days,] although they are not obligated to fast,3 they should not indulge in delicacies. Instead, they should eat only what is necessary to maintain their babies.

ה

עברו אלו ולא נענו בית דין גוזרין שבע תעניות אחרות על הצבור שני וחמישי ושני וחמישי ושני וחמישי ושני. ובאלו השבע בלבד עוברות ומניקות מתענות אבל בשאר התעניות אין עוברות ומניקות מתענות. ואף על פי שאינן מתענות אין מענגות עצמן בתפנוקים אלא אוכלות ושותות כדי קיום הולד:

6

On these seven fasts the men serving in the [weekly] priestly watch should fast for the entire day. The men of the beit av should fast for a portion of the day, but should not complete their fast.4 All the prohibitions in force during the second set of fasts are also in force during these last seven fasts.5

ו

ובשבע תעניות אלו אנשי משמר מתענין ומשלימין. ואנשי בית אב מתענין מקצת היום ולא משלימין. וכל דבר שהוא אסור בשלש אמצעיות אסור באלו השבע האחרונות:

7

There are additional dimensions [of severity] to these [fasts]: it is on these alone that we sound the trumpets, pray in the street of the city, call on an elder to admonish the people [and motivate] them to repent from their [evil] ways, add six blessings in the morning and afternoon prayers - thus, we recite twenty-four blessings, and close the stores.

On Mondays, the doors of the stores are left slightly ajar towards evening and they may be opened [for business]. On Thursdays, [the stores] may be opened the entire day [to allow people to purchase food] in honor of the Sabbath. If a store has two entrances, one entrance should be opened and the other closed. If the store has a display area in front of it, it may be opened in the normal manner on a Thursday without concern [for the above restriction].

ז

ויתרות אלו. שבהן בלבד מתריעין ומתפללין ברחוב העיר. ומורידין זקן להוכיח לעם כדי שישובו מדרכם. ומוסיפין שש ברכות בתפלת שחרית ובתפלת מנחה ונמצאו מתפללין כ"ד ברכות. ונועלין את החנויות. ובשני מטין לעת ערב ופותחין את החנויות. אבל בחמישי פותחין כל היום מפני כבוד השבת. ואם יש לחנות שני פתחים פותח אחד ונועל אחד. ואם יש לחנות אצטבה פותח כדרכו בחמישי ואינו חושש:

There are additional dimensions [of severity] to these [fasts] - The first four points mentioned in this halachah are described at length in Chapter 4.

it is on these alone that we sound the trumpets - as required in a time of distress (Chapter 1, Halachah 1). In Chapter 4, Halachot 14-17, the manner in which the trumpets are sounded is explained.

pray in the street of the city - See Chapter 4, Halachah 1

call on an elder to admonish the people [and motivate] them to repent from their [evil] ways - See Chapter 4, Halachah 2

add six blessings in the morning - See Chapter 4, Halachot 7-14

and afternoon prayers - Although the Talmud does not mention that these six blessings were added in both prayer services, were this not to be the case, it would have been proper to state that they were added only in the morning service (Maggid Mishneh).

thus, we recite twenty-four blessings - More precisely 25. The Rambam is quoting the Mishnah (Ta'anit 2:2), which refers to the era before the nineteenth blessing was added to the daily Shemoneh Esreh. (See Hilchot Tefillah 2:1.)

and close the stores - with the leniencies to be mentioned. The stores are closed to intensify the people's consciousness of the fast (Rashi, Ta'anit 14b).

On Mondays, the doors of the stores - From the Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chayim 575:4), the Ramah, and other commentaries, it appears that the leniencies mentioned here refer only to stores that sell food, but not those that carry other merchandise.

are left slightly ajar towards evening - but they should not be opened completely

and they may be opened [for business] - to allow people to purchase food for the evening meal. There are, however, certain restrictions; for example, the products in the store may not be taken out to the store's display area (Rambam's Commentary on the Mishnah, Ta'anit 1:6).

On Thursdays, [the stores] may be opened the entire day [to allow people to purchase food] in honor of the Sabbath. - The following restriction should be adhered to:

If a store has two entrances, one entrance should be opened and the other closed. - From the Rambam's Commentary on the Mishnah (loc. cit.), it appears that this restriction applies on Mondays as well as on Thursdays.

If the store has a display area - a bench for the storekeeper and/or customers to sit and a place for merchandise to be placed

in front of it, it may be opened in the normal manner on a Thursday without concern [for the above restriction]. - Rashi, Ta'anit 14b, explains that the display area prevents the entrances to the store from being seen. Hence, there is no difficulty in leaving them both open.

8

If these [fasts] pass without [their prayers] being answered, we should minimize our commercial activity, construction projects associated with joy - e.g., those involving decorative patterns on the ceilings and walls, plantings associated with joy - e.g., that of myrtle trees, and the erection of tents.

We also minimize betrothals and marriages, unless one has not fulfilled the mitzvah of being fruitful and multiplying. Whoever has fulfilled this mitzvah is forbidden to engage in sexual relations in a year of famine.

We also reduce the exchange of greetings, and the Torah sages should not exchange greetings at all. Rather, [they should conduct themselves as people] who have been rebuffed and ostracized by God. When a common person greets them, they may return the greeting in a weak and concerned tone.

ח

עברו אלו ולא נענו. ממעטין במשא ומתן ובבנין של שמחה כגון ציור וכיור. ובנטיעה של שמחה כגון מיני הדס ומיני אהלים. וממעטין באירוסין ונישואין אלא אם כן לא קיים מצות פריה ורביה. וכל מי שקיים מצות פריה ורביה אסור לו לשמש מטתו בשני רעבון. וממעטין בשאלת שלום בין אדם לחבירו. ותלמידי חכמים לא ישאלו שלום אלא כנזופין וכמנודין למקום. ועם הארץ שנתן להם שלום מחזירין לו בשפה רפה וכובד ראש:

If these [fasts] pass without [their prayers] being answered - no other communal fasts are ordained, as explained in the following halachah. The fact that no other fasts are called does not mean that the community may return to their ordinary pattern of conduct. Quite the contrary: the period is regarded as one of Divine disfavor. Hence,

we should minimize our commercial activity - The restrictions that follow were instituted to reduce joy. In contrast, this restriction appears to include all commercial activity, even that which is not directed associated with happiness (Lechem Mishneh). Seemingly, the intent is that since the time is not favorable, it is unwise to invest money and effort in commercial endeavors (Kinat Eliyahu).

There are, however, authorities who maintain that here also, the restriction involves only commercial activity associated with joy - e.g., preparing for a child's wedding or purchasing valuable articles, but ordinary business activities are permitted (Mishnah Berurah 575:18).

construction projects associated with joy - e.g., those involving decorative patterns on the ceilings and walls - In his Commentary on the Mishnah (Ta'anit 1:7), the Rambam states that this refers to ornate buildings erected by the wealthy. There is, however, no restriction on ordinary building projects necessary for one's everyday purposes.

The Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chayim 575:7) describes the prohibition as applying to "buildings of joy." The Mishnah Berurah 575:18 (based on the Tur) explains that this refers to all buildings that are unnecessary and are constructed for beauty and comfort.

plantings - In this instance, the differences between Hebrew and English have caused our translation to be non-literal. In Hebrew, the word נטיעה refers to both planting trees and setting up tents.

associated with joy - e.g., that of myrtle trees - In his Commentary on the Mishnah (ibid.), the Rambam explains that this refers to spice and flower gardens planted for pleasure. One may, however, plant orchards for the purpose of growing fruit. There are no restrictions on such activity.

and the erection of tents. - This also refers to tents set up for festive purposes; there is no restriction against pitching tents for ordinary purposes.

We also minimize betrothals and marriages - The Beit Yosef (Orach Chayim 575) interprets this to mean that a person who has fulfilled the mitzvah of fathering children should not become betrothed or marry at all.

unless one has not fulfilled the mitzvah of being fruitful and multiplying. - This involves fathering a son and a daughter. (See Hilchot Ishut 15:4.)

Whoever has fulfilled this mitzvah is forbidden to engage in sexual relations in a year of famine. - Ta'anit 11a derives this concept from Genesis 41:50, which states that Joseph's children were born before the famine. One can infer that during the famine he did not engage in relations.

This restriction was instituted because it is proper to reduce our indulgence in pleasure in a time of communal distress.

We also reduce the exchange of greetings, and the Torah sages should not exchange greetings at all. - Needless to say, frivolity and jests are also forbidden.

Rather, [they should conduct themselves as people] who have been rebuffed and ostracized by God. - A person under a ban of ostracism is forbidden to greet others or to return greetings. Hence the above prohibition.

Ta'anit 14b states that it is proper to cover one's head with a cloak as mourners do. Nevertheless, neither the Rambam nor the Shulchan Aruch quotes this obligation (perhaps because even mourners did not generally observe this custom after the Talmudic era).

When a common person greets them, they may return the greeting - lest the person become offended (Rashi, Ta'anit 14b); but when doing so, they should respond

in a weak and concerned tone - so that he will appreciate that the greeting was not in place.

9

The Torah scholars alone continue to fast, [beginning on the next] Monday, [and continuing on the following] Thursday and Monday [in this manner] until the month of Nisan - as determined in relation to the spring season - passes. This is not, however, required of the community. No more than these thirteen communal fasts are decreed because of a lack of rainfall.

When these individuals fast until Nisan passes, they are allowed to eat at night and are allowed to perform work, to wash, to anoint themselves, to engage in sexual relations, and to wear shoes as on other fast days. They do not fast on Rashei Chodashim, nor on Purim.

After the month of Nisan, as determined in relation to the spring season, passes - i.e., when the sun enters the sign of the bull - they should cease fasting. Since no rain has descended from the beginning of the year, rain in this season would be a sign of a curse.

ט

תלמידי חכמים חוזרין לבדם ומתענים שני וחמישי ושני עד שיצא ניסן של תקופה אבל לא הצבור. שאין גוזרין על הצבור בשביל גשמים שלא ירדו יתר משלש עשרה תעניות אלו. וכשמתענין היחידים עד שיצא ניסן מותרין לאכול בלילה ומותרין בעשיית מלאכה וברחיצה ובסיכה ותשמיש המטה ונעילת הסנדל כשאר כל התעניות. ומפסיקין לראשי חדשים ופורים. יצא ניסן של תקופה והוא כשהגיע השמש לתחלת מזל שור אין מתענים. שאין הגשמים בזמן הזה אלא סימן קללה הואיל ולא ירדו כל עיקר מתחלת השנה:

The Torah scholars alone continue to fast - The commentaries do not mention whether it is preferable that all the students of the Torah join in these fasts, as was stated in Halachah 1. One might presume, however, that they should. Indeed, the entire community should have been required to observe these fasts, and it is only because the Rabbis thought that this would be too difficult for them that they were released from this obligation.

[beginning on the next] Monday, [and continuing on the following] Thursday and Monday - As mentioned in the commentary on Chapter 1, Halachah 5, and in Halachah 3 of this chapter, there are opinions that maintain that if a cycle of fasts ends on Monday - as does the cycle of the seven communal fasts - the next cycle of fasts may be started on the Thursday of that week. Other opinions - and these are followed by the standard published text of the Mishneh Torah - maintain that all cycles of fasts begin on Monday. Hence, if a cycle of fasts ends on Monday, the next cycle begins on the following Monday.

This difference of opinion involves much more than one day, for these fasts are decreed in series of three. Thus, according to the opinion followed by the standard texts, the scholars would fast three days in every two weeks for the duration of the period. The other view, in contrast, would require them to fast on every Monday and Thursday.

[in this manner] until the month of Nisan - Ta'anit 1:7 states that these fasts should continue "until Nisan passes." In the Jerusalem Talmud's explanation of this Mishnah, it is explained that this refers to Nisan

as determined in relation to the spring season - which always begins in the month of Nisan. In Hilchot Kiddush HaChodesh 9:3, the Rambam defines the beginning of spring as the time the sun enters the zodiac constellation of the goat. This is the beginning of April according to the secular calendar.

passes. This is not, however, required of the community. No more than these thirteen communal fasts are decreed because of a lack of rainfall. - Ta'anit 14b considered thirteen fasts as the maximum a community should be required to undertake for this reason. More fasts would be considered an excessive burden. (Significantly, according to Kabbalah, the number thirteen is identified with God's attributes of mercy.)

As mentioned in the commentary on Chapter 1, Halachah 4, this limit applies only regarding fasts decreed because of a lack of rain. When communal fasts are decreed because of other distressing circumstances, we should continue fasting until our prayers are answered.

When these individuals fast until Nisan passes, they are allowed to eat at night - i.e., the fast begins at dawn. See Chapter 1, Halachah 8.

and are allowed to perform work, to wash, to anoint themselves, to engage in sexual relations, and to wear shoes as on other fast days. - These restrictions apply only on Yom Kippur, Tish'ah B'Av, and the latter ten fasts decreed because of a lack of rain.

They do not fast on Rashei Chodashim, nor on Purim. - As mentioned in Chapter 1, Halachah 9, an individual should not fast on these days. Although many individuals may participate in these fasts, they are still deemed individual - and not communal - fasts.

After the month of Nisan, as determined in relation to the spring season, passes - i.e. - one month after the spring season begins

when the sun enters the sign - i.e., the zodiac constellation

of the bull - This is at the beginning of the secular month of May.

they should cease fasting. Since no rain has descended from the beginning of the year, rain in this season would be a sign of a curse. - Since the land has already become parched, the rain will be of no benefit. For God to display His beneficence at such a time, after the time had passed when the rain could have helped, is a further sign of Divine disfavor (Rav Ovadiah of Bertinoro).

10

Where does the above apply? In Eretz Yisrael and in similar lands.6 In contrast, in places where the rainy season begins before or after the seventeenth of Marcheshvan,7 when the time [for the rains] arrives and no rain descends, individuals should [begin a series of three] fasts, [starting on] Monday [and continuing on the following] Thursday and Monday. They should not fast on Rashei Chodashim, Chanukah, or Purim.8

Afterwards, they should wait approximately seven days.9 If rain does not descend, the court should decree thirteen communal fasts, according to the order described above.10

י

במה דברים אמורים בארץ ישראל וכל הדומה לה. אבל מקומות שעונת הגשמים שלהן קודם י"ז במרחשון או אחר זמן זה כשיגיע זמנם ולא ירדו גשמים יחידים מתענים שני וחמישי ושני. ומפסיקין בראשי חדשים ובחנוכה ובפורים. ושוהין אחרי כן כמו שבעה ימים. אם לא ירדו גשמים בית דין גוזרין על הצבור שלש עשרה תעניות על הסדר שאמרנו:

11

[The following laws apply to] all the communal fasts decreed in the diaspora: It is permitted to eat during the night,11 and they are governed by the same laws as other fasts.12 A communal fast resembling Yom Kippur is decreed only in Eretz Yisrael,13 and only because of [a lack of] rain.14 This refers to the latter ten fasts - i.e., the middle series of three fasts and the final series of seven fasts.

יא

כל תעניות שגוזרין הצבור בחוצה לארץ אוכלים בהם בלילה ודיניהם כדין שאר התעניות. שאין גוזרין על הצבור תענית כגון צום כפור אלא בא"י בלבד ובגלל המטר. ובאותן עשר תעניות שהן שלש אמצעיות ושבע אחרונות