Thursday April 14 – 13 Nissan

Fast of the Firstborn. All firstborn males are required to fast. To be exempt from fasting, one can participate in a meal marking the fulfillment of a mitzvah; such a meal is generally held in the synagogue after morning prayers on this day.

Did you remember to sell your chametz? Your local Chabad rabbi can help, or complete an online “Authorization for the Sale of Chametz” form by clicking here.

Search for the chametz after dark (click here for the exact time). Recite the blessing prior to the search, and the nullification of the chametz (Kol Chamira) following the search. Click here for more information on the search and removal of chametz.

Friday April 15—14 Nissan

Have you sold your chametz? Final call! Your local Chabad rabbi can help, or complete an online “Authorization for the Sale of Chametz” form by clicking here.

Burn your remaining (unsold) chametz before the beginning of the sixth seasonal hour (click here for the exact time) and recite the relevant passages.

The Seder plate items and the Seder dinner food should be prepared today, before Shabbat starts. We suggest lighting a 24 or 48 hour yahrtzeit candle before Shabbat candle lighting to be used to light candles or a gas flame on the holiday.

First Seder: The Seder contains the observance of many biblical and rabbinical mitzvot, including: eating matzah, eating maror (bitter herbs), drinking four cups of wine, relating the story of the Exodus to our children, reclining as a symbol of freedom, etc. (Click here for a How-To Seder guide.)

Light Shabbat candles, reciting blessing 1. Click here for the blessings, and here for local candle lighting times.

Shabbat April 16—15 Nissan
1st day of Passover

Morning service.
Torah reading: Exodus 12:21–51 and Numbers 28:16–25.
Haftorah: Joshua 3:5–7, 5:2–6:1, 6:27.

Beginning with the Musaf Amidah, we recite morid hatal, the prayer for dew, and we omit the prayer for rain. This practice continues until Shemini Atzeret, the day after Sukkot.

The priests bless the congregation with the priestly blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Festive lunch meal.

According to Chabad custom, complete Hallel is recited during Maariv evening prayers. Yaale veyavo is also said followed by the “Counting of the Omer.” We count the 1st day of the Omer. The counting of the Omer is recited during each of the next forty-nine days, leading up to the holiday of Shavuot on the fiftieth day. The 49 days embody the 49 steps of self-improvement — beginning with the departure from our “personal” Egypt, until our arrival at Mount Sinai, when we are ready to accept the wisdom of the Torah.

After dark, light candles for the second day of Passover, using an existing flame, and recite blessings 2 & 4. Click here for the blessings, and here for local candle-lighting times.

The food for the meal can be warmed up after Shabbat has ended, using a flame that has been lit from the onset of the holiday.

Second Seder: The Seder contains the observance of many Biblical and Rabbinic Mitzvot, including: eating Matzah, eating Marror (bitter herbs), drinking four cups of wine, relating the story of the Exodus to our children, reclining as a symbol of freedom, etc. (Click here for a How-To Seder guide.)

Sunday April 17—16 Nissan
2nd day of Passover-Yom Tov

Morning service. Full Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Exodus 12:21–51 and Numbers 28:16–25. Haftorah: Joshua 3:5–7, 5:2–6:1, 6:27.

We start saying the prayer for dew during the Musaf prayer. The priests bless the congregation with the priestly blessing during the Musaf prayer.

“Yaaleh Veyavo” is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals. Festive lunch meal.

After nightfall, perform the Havdalah ceremony, omitting the blessings on the spices and on the candle flame.

Nightfall marks the beginning of Passover’s intermediate days. Between the first two and the last two days of Passover, we may resume much (not all) of our regular, workday activities (except on Shabbat, when regular Shabbat observances are kept); but, of course, we continue to eat Kosher for Passover foods exclusively. It is customary to drink a glass of wine or grape juice each day, in celebration of the festival.

Monday April 18—17 Nissan
3rd day of Passover
1st day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate days)

Morning service: In many communities, throughout the intermediate days of Passover, tefillin are not worn.

Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark. Torah reading: Exodus 13:1–16 and Numbers 28:19–25. The Musaf Amidah is recited. During all of the intermediate days, “Yaaleh Veyavo” is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

The intermediate days are observed with limited work restrictions.

After nightfall, count the 3rd day of the Omer.

Tuesday April 19—18 Nissan
4th day of Passover
2nd day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate days)

Torah reading: Exodus 22:24 - 23:19 and Numbers 28:19–25.

Morning service: In many communities, throughout the intermediate days of Passover, tefillin are not worn. Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark. During all of the intermediate days, “Yaaleh Veyavo” is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

The intermediate days are observed with limited work restrictions.

After nightfall and evening prayers, count the 4th day of the Omer.

Wednesday April 20—19 Nissan
5th day of Passover
3rd day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate days)
Torah reading: Exodus 34:1-26 and Numbers 28:19–25.

Morning service: In many communities, throughout the intermediate days of Passover, tefillin are not worn.

Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark. Torah reading: Numbers 9:1-14 and Numbers 28:19–25. The Musaf Amidah is recited. During all of the Intermediate Days, “Yaaleh Veyavo” is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

After nightfall, count the 5th day of the Omer.

The Intermediate Days are observed with limited work restrictions.

Thursday April 21—20 Nissan
6th day of Passover-Yom Tov
4th day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate days)

Morning service: In many communities, throughout the intermediate days of Passover, tefillin are not worn.

Half Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark. Torah reading: Numbers 9:1–14 and Numbers 28:19–25. The Musaf Amidah is recited. During all of the Intermediate Days, Yaaleh Veyavo is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

The Intermediate Days are observed with limited work restriction.

We prepare an eruv tavshilin so that we will be able to cook and prepare for Shabbat on Friday, as well as to be able to light Shabbat candles.

Light candles for the 7th day of Passover, and recite blessing 3. Click here for the blessing, and here for local candle lighting times.

Evening prayers. After the Amidah, count the 6th day of the Omer.

It is customary in many communities to remain awake all night, studying Torah, in commemoration of the great miracle of the Splitting of the Sea, which occurred on the 7th day of Passover.

Friday April 22—21 Nissan
7th day of Passover — Shevi'i Shel Pesach

Morning service. Half Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Exodus 13:17–15:26 and Numbers 28:19–25.
Haftorah: II Samuel 22:1–51.

The Priests bless the congregation with the Priestly Blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Festive lunch meal.

Evening prayers. After the Amidah, count the 7th day of the Omer.

Light candles for the 8th day of Passover after dark, using an existing flame, and recite blessing 2. Click here for the blessing, and here for local candle lighting times.

Shabbat April 23 – 22 Nissan
Final Day of Passover — Acharon Shel Pesach

Morning service. Half Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Deuteronomy 15:19–16:17 and Numbers 28:19–25.
Haftarah: Isaiah 10:32–12:6.

The Yizkor memorial service is recited following the Torah reading.

The Priests bless the congregation with the Priestly Blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Festive lunch meal.

On this final day of Passover we strive for the highest level of freedom, and focus on the Final Redemption. Following the Baal Shem Tov’s custom, we end Passover with “Moshiach’s Feast” — a festive meal complete with matzah and four cups of wine, during which we celebrate the imminent arrival of the Messiah. The feast begins before sunset and continues until after nightfall.

Evening prayers, the weekday Amidah is recited. After the Amidah, count the 8th day of the Omer.

After nightfall, perform the Havdalah ceremony, omitting the blessings on the spices and on the candle flame.

Nightfall is the official end of Passover (for the exact time, click here). Wait an hour to give the rabbi enough time to buy back your chametz before eating it.

Sunday April 24—23 Nissan

The day following the holiday is known as Isru Chag. It is forbidden to fast on this day.