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Thursday, October 7, 2021

Halachic Times (Zmanim)
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Rosh Chodesh Cheshvan
Jewish History

The Holy Temple, which took seven years to build, was completed by King Solomon during the month of MarCheshvan (I Kings 6:38), although not necessarily on this exact day. (Its dedication, however, was postponed until Tishrei of the following year—see calendar entry for 8 Tishrei). The First Temple served as the epicenter of Jewish national and spiritual life for 410 years, until its destruction by the Babylonians in 423 BCE.

Links:
The Holy Temple; The Holy Temple: An Anthology

Laws and Customs

Today is the second of the two Rosh Chodesh ("Head of the Month") days for the month of Cheshvan (when a month has 30 days, both the last day of the month and the first day of the following month serve as the following month's Rosh Chodesh).

Special portions are added to the daily prayers: Hallel (Psalms 113-118) is recited -- in its "partial" form -- following the Shacharit morning prayer, and the Yaaleh V'yavo prayer is added to the Amidah and to Grace After Meals; the additional Musaf prayer is said (when Rosh Chodesh is Shabbat, special additions are made to the Shabbat Musaf). Tachnun (confession of sins) and similar prayers are omitted.

Many have the custom to mark Rosh Chodesh with a festive meal and reduced work activity. The latter custom is prevalent amongst women, who have a special affinity with Rosh Chodesh -- the month being the feminine aspect of the Jewish Calendar.

Links: The 29th Day; The Lunar Files

The month of Cheshvan is also called "Mar-Cheshvan." Mar means "bitter" -- an allusion to the fact that the month contains no festive days. Mar also means "water", alluding to the month's special connection with rains (the 7th of Cheshvan is the day on which Jews begin praying for rain (in the Holy Land), and the Great Flood, which we read about in this week's Torah reading, began on Cheshvan 17th).

Links: The Last Jew

Daily Thought

How was Joseph able to overcome the natural human instinct to take revenge against his brothers, and instead provide them only good?

Because he knew that all the travail that had befallen him was ordained from heaven. His brothers were no more than agents to a divine plan.

As he himself later told them, “Although your intentions were to harm me, G-d’s intentions were for good.”

G-d is good and all He does is for the good. And indeed Joseph saw that all turned out good—for he was now in the most eminent position to assist his family at this time of famine.

And since only good came from their actions, they truly deserved good in return.

This is what we are meant to learn from Joseph’s goodness to his brothers: That there is no human being to blame or to hold a grudge against for whatever has befallen you.

Yes, someone made a bad decision, and perhaps you can exact payment for that in court.

But whatever has befallen you was already determined in a heavenly court. And it is all for the good. If you will embrace it, you will come to see how it is for the good.

And if so, what sense is there in holding a grudge?

Likutei Sichot vol. 5, pg 241. Ibid vol. 20, 191.