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Sunday, October 9, 2022

Halachic Times (Zmanim)
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Erev Sukkot
Jewish History

R. Israel of Kosnitz was a disciple of a number of great chassidic Rebbes, including R. DovBer of Mezeritch. A famed miracle worker, he authored the work Avodat Yisrael and was one of the disseminators of Chassidism in Poland.

Link: Not Good to Be Alone

Laws and Customs

It is customary to prepare the "four kinds" for use on Sukkot, binding the three hadassim (myrtle twigs) and two aravot (willow twigs) to the lulav (palm frond), in the sukkah on the afternoon preceding the festival.

Link: It Takes All Kinds

Daily Thought

Joseph had two sons in Egypt. From their names, we learn how a human being can be successful in this world.

He named the first son Menasheh, which means to forget. Whenever Joseph called Menasheh, he remembered that this land was causing him to forget his true home and all that his father had taught him.

And so he never forgot.

He named his second son Ephraim, which means to be productive. Whenever Joseph called Ephraim, he remembered that he had a purpose to accomplish in Egypt, so that his family could eventually settle there in dignity and prosperity.

And so he was successful.

Just as the names of both sons were crucial to Joseph’s success, so too every human being must keep two memories awake at all times:

This material world is not your true place, for your soul descended into this body from a luminous, heavenly place.

And you are here for a purpose, to channel that heavenly light into this world.

Menasheh came first, but Ephraim, Jacob later told Joseph, was greater.

Because first you must remember that this is not your true place.

And only then will you remember to accomplish your true purpose, to bring this earthly world in harmony with that place from which you came.

Likutei Sichot, vol. 15, pg. 433.