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Friday, December 4, 2020

Halachic Times (Zmanim)
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Jewish History

Rabbi Abraham Maimuni HaNagid (also called "Rabbi Avraham ben HaRambam") was the only son of Maimonides (the famed Talmudist, codifier of Jewish Law, philosopher, physician and statesmen, Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, 1135-1204). Born in 1185, Rabbi Abraham succeeded his father as the leader of the Jewish community in Fostat (old Cairo), Egypt, at the tender age of 19. He wrote many responsa and commentaries explaining and defending his father's writings and Halachic rulings. Rabbi Abraham passed away on the 18th of Kislev of the year 4998 from creation (1237).

Rabbi Baruch was the son of Rabbi Israel Baal Shem Tov's daughter, Adel, and her husband, Rabbi Yechiel Ashkenazi. He was born in 1753 in Mezhibuz, the town from which his illustrious grandfather led the Chassidic Movement. He was one of the pre-eminent Rebbes (Chassidic masters) in the 3rd generation of Chassidism, and had thousands of disciples and followers.

Link: Stories of Rabbi Baruch of Mezhibuz

Laws and Customs
In Chabad practice, starting in the afternoon, Tachnun (confession of sins) and similar prayers are omitted.
Daily Thought

“I lift my eyes to the mountains, from whence will come my help?
My help is from G-d, who creates heaven and earth.”

—Psalms 121:1-2.

People believe that only fools are optimists. But the opposite is true.

Precisely because we understand how desperate the situation really is, how helpless we are, and how impossible the challenge, that itself tells us that we cannot survive without the help of the One Above, the One who created all this universe from the beginning.

And it tells us how great a G‑d we have—a G‑d who can lift us high beyond the natural order and transform the most ominous darkness to brilliant good.

The greater a realist you are, the greater your optimism must be.


20 Cheshvan 5741.