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Monday, October 3, 2022

Halachic Times (Zmanim)
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Jewish History

The 14-day dedication festivities, celebrating the completion of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem built by King Solomon, commenced on the 8th of Tishrei of the year 2935 from creation (826 BCE). The First Temple served as the epicenter of Jewish national and spiritual life for 410 year, until its destruction by the Babylonians in 423 BCE.

Links: The Holy Temple: an Anthology

Yahrtzeit of Rabbi Baruch, father of the founder of Chabad, Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi.

On 29–30 September (8–9 Tishrei), 1941, German forces aided by Ukrainian collaborators massacred over 30,000 Jews in the Babi Yar ravine near Kiev, Ukraine.

Link: Was the Holocaust a Punishment from G‑d?
Laws and Customs

The 10-day period beginning on Rosh Hashanah and ending on Yom Kippur is known as the "Ten Days of Repentance"; this is the period, say the sages, of which the prophet speaks when he proclaims (Isaiah 55:6) "Seek G-d when He is to be found; call on Him when He is near." Psalm 130, Avinu Malkeinu and other special inserts and additions are included in our daily prayers during these days.

The Baal Shem Tov instituted the custom of reciting three additional chapters of Psalms each day, from the 1st of Elul until Yom Kippur (on Yom Kippur the remaining 36 chapters are recited, thereby completing the entire book of Psalms). Click below for today's three Psalms.

Chapter 109
Chapter 110
Chapter 111

Links: About the Ten Days of teshuvah; Voicemail; more on teshuvah

In certain communities, it is customary to perform the Tashlich ceremony today (if the day doesn't fall on Shabbat.)

Daily Thought

Jethro was an explorer, a trekker through the stars that rule the darkness.

Jethro discovered the meaning of each deity of every pantheon of gods, the forces they controlled, the energies to be exploited by worshipping them, the place each held in the power struggle of nature and being.

Until he arrived at a place from which he could look back and say, “Their power is an illusion. They are nothing more than conduits, the agencies of a perfect, transcendent Oneness Who pervades the universe.”

Then He saw the miracles wrought for the Jewish people, wonders that engaged every force of nature in unison, that connected heaven and earth as one.

Jethro knew he had arrived at truth. With him, he brought the secret of every false power, the wisdom that emerges from darkness.

And now Torah could enter the world.

Darkness, he found, can teach us more about light than light could ever say.

Likutei Sichot vol. 11, Yitro 1. Ibid vol. 16.