Times displayed for
Westborough, MA 01581 | change

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Calendar for: Chabad of Westborough 54 South Street, Westborough, MA 01581   |   Contact Info
Halachic Times (Zmanim)
Times for Westborough, MA 01581
4:01 AM
Dawn (Alot Hashachar):
4:48 AM
Earliest Tallit and Tefillin (Misheyakir):
5:45 AM
Sunrise (Hanetz Hachamah):
9:16 AM
Latest Shema:
10:28 AM
Latest Shacharit:
12:51 PM
Midday (Chatzot Hayom):
1:28 PM
Earliest Mincha (Mincha Gedolah):
5:04 PM
Mincha Ketanah (“Small Mincha”):
6:33 PM
Plag Hamincha (“Half of Mincha”):
7:58 PM
Sunset (Shkiah):
8:30 PM
Nightfall (Tzeit Hakochavim):
12:52 AM
Midnight (Chatzot HaLailah):
71:48 min.
Shaah Zmanit (proportional hour):
Jewish History

In 1843, the Interior Ministry of the Czarist government convened a rabbinical conference in the Russian capital of Petersburg, to the end of imposing changes in Jewish communal life and religious practice. Rabbi Menachem Mendel of Lubavitch (1789-1866, known as the "Tzemach Tzedek" after his Halachic works by that name) was invited; as a primary figure in the leadership of Russian Jewry, his compliance was required to lend legitimacy to the government's proposed "reforms". In the course of the conference, the Tzemach Tzeddek was placed under arrest no less than 22 (!) times for his refusal to cooperate. When he finally departed Petersburg on the 26th of Av, he had successfully prevented the government's disruption of traditional Jewish life.

Links:
A Brief Biography of the Tzemach Tzedek
More on the Tzemach Tzeddek

Daily Thought

A favorite story of the Rebbe, central to his activist view of life:

Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi, the first rebbe of the Lubavitch dynasty, led the services for Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the year.

He stood wrapped in his prayer shawl, profoundly entranced in the cleaving of his soul to its origin in the Infinite Light. Every word of prayer he uttered was fire. His melody and fervor carried the entire community off to the highest and the deepest journey of the spirit.

And then he stopped. He turned, cast off his prayer shawl and left the synagogue. With a bewildered congregation chasing behind, he walked briskly to the outskirts of town, to a small dark house from where was heard the cry of a newborn infant. The rabbi entered the house, chopped some wood and lit a fire in the oven, boiled some soup and cared for the mother and child who lay helpless in bed.

Then he returned to the synagogue and to the ecstasy of his prayer.

The Rebbe added:

Note that the rabbi removed his prayer shawl. To help someone, you must leave your world, no matter how serene, to enter the place where that person lives.