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ב"ה
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Sunday, 29 Nissan, 5781

Halachic Times (Zmanim)
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Omer: Day 14 - Malchut sheb'Gevurah
Tonight Count 15
Laws and Customs

Tomorrow is the fifteenth day of the Omer Count. Since, on the Jewish calendar, the day begins at nightfall of the previous evening, we count the omer for tomorrow's date tonight, after nightfall: "Today is fifteen days, which are two weeks and one day, to the Omer." (If you miss the count tonight, you can count the omer all day tomorrow, but without the preceding blessing).

The 49-day "Counting of the Omer" retraces our ancestors' seven-week spiritual journey from the Exodus to Sinai. Each evening we recite a special blessing and count the days and weeks that have passed since the Omer; the 50th day is Shavuot, the festival celebrating the Giving of the Torah at Sinai.

Tonight's Sefirah: Chessed sheb'Tifferet -- "Kindness in Harmony"

The teachings of Kabbalah explain that there are seven "Divine Attributes" -- Sefirot -- that G-d assumes through which to relate to our existence: Chessed, Gevurah, Tifferet, Netzach, Hod, Yesod and Malchut ("Love", "Strength", "Beauty", "Victory", "Splendor", "Foundation" and "Sovereignty"). In the human being, created in the "image of G-d," the seven sefirot are mirrored in the seven "emotional attributes" of the human soul: Kindness, Restraint, Harmony, Ambition, Humility, Connection and Receptiveness. Each of the seven attributes contain elements of all seven--i.e., "Kindness in Kindness", "Restraint in Kindness", "Harmony in Kindness", etc.--making for a total of forty-nine traits. The 49-day Omer Count is thus a 49-step process of self-refinement, with each day devoted to the "rectification" and perfection of one the forty-nine "sefirot."

Links:
How to count the Omer
The deeper significance of the Omer Count

Tonight begins the first day of Rosh Chodesh Iyar.

Daily Thought

People ask, “How can I have confidence that everything will work out for the best? Perhaps I don’t deserve the best. Perhaps I’ve already messed up so bad, G‑d has given up on me.”

These people are confusing trust with faith.

Faith is something you may or may not have. But trust is something you do. Hard.

Trust is when, in times of trouble, you cleave so unshakably to the heavens, you pull them down to earth.

Trust is a mighty, heroic bond. Trust changes who you are—and what you deserve.

And it is available to anybody, at any moment, no matter who they were the moment before.