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ב"ה
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Friday, 21 Adar, 5781

Halachic Times (Zmanim)
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Jewish History

In the course of a fight with a Christian fisherman, a Jew dealt him a blow which led to his death. The infuriated Christians of Narbonne, France, started rioting and attacking the Jewish community.

The governor of Narbonne, Don Aymeric, quickly intervened, and dispatched a contingent of soldiers to protect the Jewish community. The riot was immediately halted and all the spoils stolen during the riots were returned to the Jews. The 21st of Adar was recorded as "Purim Narbonne," a day when the community annually celebrated this historic event.

The great Rabbi Elimelech of Lizhensk (1717-1786) was one of the elite disciples of Rabbi DovBer, the Maggid of Mezritch, and a colleague of Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi. He is also widely known as the No'am Elimelech, the title of the renowned chassidic work he authored.

Rabbi Elimelech attracted many thousands of chassidim, among them many who after his passing became great chassidic masters in their own right. Most notable amongst them was Rabbi Yaakov Yitzchak Horowitz, the "Seer of Lublin." Many of the current chassidic dynasties trace themselves back to Rabbi Elimelech.

Link: R. Elimelech of Lizhensk

Daily Thought

Standing there, looking down from Mount Sinai, Moses had to make a decision.

In his hands, he held two tablets, the work of G-d, engraved by G-d with His own words. No objects more precious than these two stone tablets had ever materialized in this universe.

Below, he beheld his people in the debauchery of their sin, worshipping a golden calf only forty days after hearing from G-d Himself, “You shall have no other gods.”

If Moses would hold onto the tablets, he would have to deliver them, and then, he knew, none of those who had any involvement with the golden calf would have a chance of survival. He was their leader, their shepherd.

Yet it was to receive the Torah that he had liberated the people from Egypt and brought them here. It was to receive the Torah that he had ascended the mountain and lived as a heavenly being, without food, water or sleep, for 40 days and 40 nights. For Moses, these two tablets lay at the very essence of his being.

And now, Moses had to decide: Are the people here to keep the Torah, or is the Torah here to liberate the souls of the people?

So he shattered the tablets. And he saved the people.

And with that, Moses established forever the relationship between the Torah and the people.

Likutei Sichot vol. 34, pp. 217-224. See also ibid vol. 21, pp. 173-180.