Enter your email address to get our weekly email with fresh, exciting and thoughtful content that will enrich your inbox and your life.
COVID-19 Passover Resources Go
Please help Chabad.org   Donate Today!
To view Shabbat Times click here to set your location

Sunday, March 29, 2020

Halachic Times (Zmanim)
To view Halachic Times click here to set your location
Jewish History

On the morning of the 4th of Nissan, a civilian convoy of doctors and nurses traveling to the Hadassah Hospital on Mount Scopus (see Today in Jewish History for 20 Iyar) was attacked by Arab forces. Of the ten vehicles in the caravan, five escaped. The other five vehicles, however, which included two buses and an ambulance, were riddled with machine gun fire and later set ablaze. Altogether 77 Jewish civilians were massacred on that day.

Shortly afterwards, the hospital was closed down and moved to the western part of Jerusalem.

The Mt. Scopus hospital only reopened after the eastern part of Jerusalem was liberated by Israel in the 1967 Six-Day War. Primarily staffed by Israeli doctors, it is the largest and best equipped hospital in the eastern section of Jerusalem.

Laws and Customs

In today's "Nasi" reading (see "Nasi of the Day" in Nissan 1), we read of the gift bought by the nasi of the tribe of Reuben, Elitzur ben Shedeur, for the inauguration of the Mishkan.

Text of today's Nasi in Hebrew and English.

Daily Thought

“I lift my eyes to the mountains, from whence will come my help?
My help is from G-d, who creates heaven and earth.”

—Psalms 121:1-2.

People believe that only fools are optimists. But the opposite is true.

Precisely because we understand how desperate the situation really is, how helpless we are, and how impossible the challenge, that itself tells us that we cannot survive without the help of the One Above, the One who created all this universe from the beginning.

And it tells us how great a G‑d we have—a G‑d who can lift us high beyond the natural order and transform the most ominous darkness to brilliant good.

The greater a realist you are, the greater your optimism must be.


20 Cheshvan 5741.